Developing a digital culture to meet citizen expectations in Local Government services

Originally published as a guest blog on techUK Insights

A recent conversation with a Local Government IT manager led me to consider again what ‘digital’ means and what digital transformation means to the way that we deliver local services.

My colleague argued that ‘digital’ is just an expression of new technologies, and digital innovation could be best expressed in traditional IT terms, after all the IT world has always embraced change and new ideas.

I accept that it is certainly true that technology is important to deliver the ‘digital revolution’ and new technologies form the bedrock on which transformation is built.

But I would suggest that digital transformation is not primarily about technology changes but by the changes we observe in culture, communication, consumerism and the unprecedented transformation of society’s operating model.

The ubiquitous and unprecedented scale of societal change has happened in just the last five to ten years, and it’s getting more difficult to remember a life before Apple, Google, Facebook and Instagram.

In Local Government, where digital transformation is looking to leave a lasting and sustainable legacy that genuinely improves citizens’ lives and futures, the Sopra Steria approach has certainly been to make the best use of available technologies, but has always been supported by a strong business spine. We have endeavored to match both the ambitions of our clients with the desire of their stakeholders to consume services in the ways that they are increasingly using to access other markets. Game changing platforms such as Facebook, Uber, Deliveroo and Amazon do not allow other providers of goods and services to continue with traditional methods and still retain happy customers. For these and other digital leaders, digital transformation has been powered by an enormous leap in customer expectation.

In Local Government this customer expectation across a diverse range of services is also driving change and we see many different approaches to delivering digital business strategies.

So how should Local Government drive through this digital change?

We recognise four key ingredients for success which concentrate on how digital can transform the way Councils and their citizens both provide, and receive, services. They recognise that it needs careful planning if it is to provide real, useful, affordable and usable alternatives to the current methodologies.

1. Make the most of existing technology

The first stage focuses on long term planning, and encourages the immediate use of facilities already available within existing technology applications and platforms to ensure that current investment is used to its full potential. This approach encourages quick wins at low cost.

2. Small step transformation

At stage two, we start to enhance the physical service delivery with digital content, taking small manageable steps towards digital transformation. The intention is to enhance the customer experience by increasing the ability to interact with the council online and to start to introduce new ways of working.

3. Re-imagining delivery

Stage three makes greater and greater use of a redesigned on- line presence to replace or extend existing physical processes with digital operations and digital enablers. This would be visible through continuous customer improvement processes that increase customer contacts through digital access channels and offers the digital fulfilment of service requests. Where appropriate, the web will become the default channel of choice, allowing greater service time and funding to be diverted to supporting more vulnerable citizens.

4. A digital business

The final stage of the digital transformation is to develop new digital business and operating models that reach the full potential of the digital environment without just reflecting and duplicating existing physical process.

The activity would be to redesign existing business structures to take full advantage of a digital approach to service delivery. This may take the form of working with partners to improve business outcomes by sharing data and processes. It may consider new commissioning models that are not restricted by traditional barriers but that continue to improve service delivery whilst also reducing operating costs.

The world is changing and digital is changing the ways that we work, rest and play. In another five years we will look back at an unprecedented period of change. Let’s make sure that Local Government is able to embrace the opportunity to deliver lasting and sustainable change today and provide that solid foundation for the next revolution – whatever that may be.

The clock is ticking!

What do you think? Leave a reply below or contact me by email.

If you’re not assessing you’re guessing: the value of an evidence based approach to strategic resource allocation

There are signs at my gym, that say ‘If you’re not assessing you’re guessing’. It’s something that is easy to ignore in your personal life, but in a business context measurement is becoming mission critical. At the Police Superintendents’ Association of England and Wales (PSAEW) Annual Conference last week, there’s been considerable talk about stretched resources – starting with the opening speech from the President of the Association, Gareth Thomas.

“I suggest we have a perfect storm developing, comprised of fewer resources, reduced public services, new threats, and a worrying increase in some types of traditional crime. If the model for delivering policing services in the future is fewer people, working longer, each doing ever more, then I suggest that model is fundamentally flawed.”

Other presentations and conversations also highlighted the fatigue officers are feeling from heavy workloads and indeed 72.2% of respondents to the 2017 Police Federation Pay and Morale Survey said that their workload had increased in the last year.

With talk of fewer resources and overworked officers and teams, the importance of measurement takes another dimension, with forces needing to have access to the evidence which not only enables them to clearly understand the impact of changing demand and resource levels for budgeting purposes, but also helps them to balance the welfare of officers.

For the team at Cleveland Police, this ‘Evidence Based approach to strategic resource allocation’ is something that they’ve been working on for some time. In one of the breakout sessions at the PSAEW Conference Brian Thomas, Assistant Chief Officer at Cleveland Police shared his force’s story about the great strides they’ve taken in organisational planning and how this has had a huge impact in working with teams across the force to take some of the stress out of resource decision making.

Supported by a new tool, PrediKt developed in conjunction with Sopra Steria, Brian and his team are able to operate in a more informed way.

He shared three areas where the force is now regularly using PrediKt:

Reality testing – Validating actual performance against planned performance. It is giving an evidence base to quickly identify what teams are busy doing and, through a dashboard, they have information which highlights automatically when teams’ actual workload is outstripping their resource. An example is when Neighbourhood teams are recording a greater percentage of response work and less time on preventative activities. The force is now able investigate the reasons behind the inconsistency and put action plans in place to resolve the issue.

Evidence based resource planning – moving from examining performance at an individual team level, here Cleveland Police are now able to examine resourcing at an organisational level and look at different scenarios based around the changing shape of crime, for example the impact of an increase in domestic burglary and how resources can be reallocated across the Force to ensure the workload is balanced across all teams and crime types.

Futures planning – the final example was to examine a resource profile change and identify what future resource profiling could look like if we need to increase training days per annum for example to comply with new statutory course requirements. A further example was what would be the impact of reducing officer numbers.

It’s clear that workload isn’t decreasing, as NPCC Chief Sara Thornton told the conference, ‘everybody knows what police should do more of; few say what we could do less of’. The final presentations also brought home the reality of cyber crime and the changing nature of crime, which will have a huge impact on policing and resourcing in the future.

It’s a world where forces really should be ‘assessing and not guessing’.

Getting a formal evidence base will transform resourcing so forces can truly assess the impact of changes to demand and resource levels, as well as helping to balance the welfare of officers.

Find more about PrediKt, Sopra Steria’s Police Resource and Demand Modelling Tool or contact me by email.

Reinventing business models: what can the public sector learn from digital disruption of business?

In my last blog I wrote about how government is challenged by technological change and globalisation. I now want to explore what governments might learn from the experience of the private sector.

Globalisation is connected to the rise of consumerism. But its attributes of brands, choices, service, access and responsiveness are no longer the preserve of the private sphere.  Increasingly, these attributes define the expectations of the public when they interact with government or use public services.

Unless public services can adapt to these new expectations, the ability to sustain a consensus for the provision of public services free at the point of use may prove impossible in the long term.

Business, of course, has been at the forefront of shaping this ‘new world’. But those forces equally challenge us.

How, for example, does business reform its governance in a way that inspires the trust and confidence of investors and is accountable to employees and the wider public?  How should businesses respond to the opportunities of the global market and new technology, both of which are producing a revolution in the way the business operates?

Let me give you just one example of how these global pressures are influencing business today.

Thirty years ago, businesses could almost entirely rely upon product cycles that lasted for three to five years and business models that could last a decade.  The great companies of the last century created products and refined their supply chains over decades. And they based their business models on relatively stable markets, high barriers to entry and a plentiful supply of relatively unskilled labour.

However many of the most successful companies today are those that have developed a capacity to reinvent themselves – not just once every ten years – but now every eighteen months or two years.

Businesses operate in a global competitive market.  They are challenged to create new value, improve productivity and respond to tomorrow’s customer needs – today.  That global competitive market ensures that today’s businesses simply cannot afford to wait five to ten years to develop a new product cycle or business model. For those companies and communities that are equal to the challenge, this relentless competitive pressure is creating new sources of wealth has increased standards of living.

Next week, I’ll be talking in more detail about innovation and why businesses might have an advantage over the public sector. In the meantime, if you enjoyed this post, I’d be very grateful if you’d help it spread by emailing it to a friend, or sharing it on Twitter or Facebook.  And if you are interested in public sector innovation you might be interested in another of my recent blogs where I wrote about how businesses learn from mistakes.

The world is still flat: how economic change is straining our ability to remake public services

I want to talk to you about what is arguably the greatest domestic policy challenge facing governments over the next decade.

How to create the conditions for a sustained transformation in our public services in a way consistent with the fundamental values that underpinned their creation.

In this first in a series of blogs, I want to anchor the debate about public service reform in the context of a number of global pressures affecting governments.

Every government is challenged by a similar set of pressures. The most significant of these is when a combination of rapid technological change leads to profound transformation of the economy. This has significantly increased prosperity. But governments are struggling to maintain a consensus of support, particularly as communities experience periods of insecurity and upheaval when technology is introduced.

The change unleashed is provoking tough and searching questions for governments of all political persuasions.

How do we reconcile rising flows of goods, services, capital and labour mobility with the need to create and sustain socially cohesive communities?

At the same time the capacity and capability of health, education, social care, housing and other public services to respond to change is curtailed by continuing austerity. And our ability to build cohesive communities is even more difficult when the very mechanism for reconciling competing tensions within communities – the institution of government and the process of democracy – has never been more questioned.

People’s sense of ‘connectedness’ with government and the political process looks increasingly weak and shattered.

Next week, I’ll post about how business has responded to the challenge of technological change. The most successful businesses are agile – attempting to reinvent their their business model to meet rapidly evolving customer needs.

Meanwhile if you enjoyed this you might also enjoy my summary of our government digital trends survey. We asked civil servants how their work is influenced by new digital ways of working and the benefits for the public

Regulation and compliance: the new certainties in life

by Miles Elliott, Director of Credit Risk

Benjamin Franklin once wrote that ‘in this world nothing can be said to be certain except death and taxes’. But in these more modern times, especially for financial services organisations – we should perhaps add ‘regulation and compliance’ to the list. In 2018, a wave of new regulation is being introduced – and one of the most far reaching is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

GDPR: are you ready…?

From 25 May 2018, organisations across Europe will have to strengthen controls associated with collecting, managing and using personal data. Resulting activity will see significant changes to IT systems as well as the way organisations engage with their customers.

There’s less than a year to go until GDPR becomes a way of life, but a survey in May 2017 suggested that only 10% of organisations have mature GDPR plans in place – with a further 40% at an intermediate phase.

That leaves half of organisations at the beginning of their compliance journey – and the clock is ticking!

GDPR: the cost of non-compliance…

Becoming fully GDPR compliant will be challenging and will require a holistic approach to data management and governance. Organisations run the risk of failing to respond to the scope of activity involved and the amount of time needed to ensure compliance. Another common issue is the lack of skills and experience to deliver such a comprehensive change to governance controls across a business. To put this into context, in 2016 alone there were 1.4 billion data breaches across the industry.

Fines for failing to comply with GDPR are expected to be highly penal as well as leading to material reputational damage.

Don’t go it alone – work with an expert in assured compliance

So what should today’s hard-pressed organisations do, especially if they don’t understand the full extent of GDPR?  The answer is to work with an organisation like Sopra Steria that’s got a track record in complex data management AND offers a ‘comprehensive’ approach to GDPR compliance. Our pragmatic ‘think, build and run’ approach empowers organisations to pick and choose the path to GDPR compliance that is right for them. As experts in Data, Analytics and Technology, we can help you quickly identify data gaps and risks, work with you to develop remediation solutions and support you moving forward with on-going compliance monitoring.

The clock is ticking…

So don’t get caught out! Make sure you aren’t one of the 50% of companies still asking “What is this GDPR”?  Take your first steps today to GDPR compliance and get fully prepared for the 2018 deadline. Remember, 2018 is the year of new regulation – make sure it’s a happy one!

See more information about how we can help you get compliant.

Get in touch to discuss how to meet your GDPR challenge and support your journey to assured compliance.

Everything is connected. Don’t innovate in isolation

…These are the words Alberta Soranzo left the audience with as she drew the final keynote speech of this year’s UX Scotland conference to a close.

Alberta, who was recently appointed Director of End-to-End Service Design at Lloyds Banking Group, strives to make a real impact on the financial outcomes of people by taking a look at both the big picture as well as focusing on the very small things, which she believes ‘matter a lot’.

Alberta stressed the importance of nurturing diverse talent and stated that it is vital to foster a culture of continuous learning within a design team. This is something that resonated with me as a culture we are striving to cultivate here at Sopra Steria — through hiring a diverse range of people from a whole range of different backgrounds and with differing areas of expertise. However, most importantly, each of these individuals share a desire to learn and continually improve. This allows the design team to avoid the previously mentioned isolated innovation which Alberta warned about and work as a team to grow and develop.

Those who attended UX Scotland may well have met the various members of the Sopra Steria team who were there – either during the various workshops and seminars on offer or at our stand in the foyer. Some may even have entered our interactive competition which invited people to ‘step into out customers shoes’. Through sponsoring the stand we were afforded the chance to speak to a whole host of interesting people during our time at the conference, including a couple of people who have since interviewed for and accepted roles within the Service Design team at Sopra Steria.

Over the course of the three day conference we got the chance to experience a number of great talks by a range of different speakers. We were given the opportunity to hear from leading industry experts such as Jared Spool and Dana Chisnell. We were also able to take part in the various workshops on offer which allowed us to develop our existing skills as well as learning new ones.

With many of the talks and workshops occurring at the same time, there were understandably frustrating moments where we were unable to attend all the talks that we would have liked to. Thankfully, with so many members of the team present at the conference, we were able to minimise the effects of timetable clashes by spreading ourselves across the events which occurred at the same time. By taking notes during each session, team members were able to report back and share their knowledge with the team who were unable to attend.

Our Service Design team listening to Jared Spool’s keynote speech
Our Service Design team listening to Jared Spool’s keynote speech

 

This notion of shared knowledge strikes right to the core of what Alberta Soranzo was talking about during her Keynote speech. By avoiding innovating in isolation, and looking at development at a wider level, it allows the team to grow and develop their skills at a greater rate.

By allowing everyone to benefit from the knowledge gained at events like this, we help cultivate the culture of continuous learning and as the old adage goes, allow the team to become more than the sum of its parts.

What do you think? Do leave a reply below or contact me by email.

Finding 10,000 ways that don’t work: what government can learn from business

Failure is not something to be embarrassed about. As Thomas Edison said about his many attempts at creating a lightbulb, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that don’t work”. Then, of course, he found a way that did work and that is all anyone remembers.

Our government today is too often paralysed by fear. Taking risks is viewed as reckless because civil servants are afraid of getting criticised should a project stumble. Nobody wants to face the fury of the Public Accounts Committee.

But among entrepreneurs, failure is more like a badge of honour. It is proof that you were not afraid to push your limits. In fact, some tech companies will not hire people if they are unable to point to at least one great failure. Steve Jobs is the most remarkable example of this phenomena. He co-founds Apple Computer when he is 21, and by the time he is 23 he’s a millionaire. He becomes legendary. And then, at 30, it all comes crashing down.

We need more of this entrepreneurial mind-set in government. And we need public sector leaders to create the conditions for it to flourish. If somebody starts a company and fails then they start another company. If that person is smart and humble they learn the lessons. Jobs wanted to prove his early success at Apple was not a fluke. He launched a new computer company, NeXT, and also Pixar Animation Studios. I love Pixar movies!

In 1996, a struggling Apple acquired NeXT, returning Jobs to the company he helped to create. And the following year Jobs became Apple’s CEO, driving the company to its greatest successes, from the iPod to the iMac to the iPhone to the iPad.

It is too commonplace to blame the blunders of government on civil servants and other public servants. Yet the way our public services are currently structured means success is rarely defined as achieving results. Instead it is about keeping your head down, putting in the hours, and not breaking the rules. Process dominates and outcome is secondary.

In business, of course, the outcomes always has to be first. Because if you do not make enough money then your business dies. Anyone who has run a small business knows the feeling of having to innovate to survive. In those moments people come up with some of their best ideas.

I am not suggesting that government should be run like a business. Or that all politicians should act like entrepreneurs. However, we do need to take some of the elements of the best of business – being agile, networked, innovative and willing to take calculated risks. And making mistakes. And incorporate them into government. Given how fast the world is changing it is the only way government can keep up.

Nobody put this better than Steve Jobs in his speech to Stanford graduates in 2005 (two years before he launched the iPhone).

“I didn’t see it then, but it turned out that getting fired from Apple was the best thing that could have ever happened to me. The heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a beginner again, less sure about everything. It freed me to enter into one of the most creative periods of my life.”

What do you think? Leave a reply below or contact me by email.