continual improvement

Continual service improvement – the clue’s in the name

Many organisations struggle to implement effective continual service improvement (CSI). Many purport to deliver CSI but are paying lip-service to the principle and missing the point. The clue is in the name.

Continual

CSI is not a once a year workshop that creates an actions list that sits in a dark recess on a shared drive for the next eleven months. It’s a consideration for every day. What isn’t working? What causes your team pain? You can even think of it from a selfish perspective – what bits of my job do I hate and why do I hate them? How can I improve them so I don’t hate them anymore?

Service

What you are providing is a service. It’s not a contract (though it is likely to be contractually bound). We hear more and more about customer experience yet we forget that we, as service professionals, are providing a service to our clients, not a list of activities or outputs. When considering CSI, ask yourself how your service feels to a customer and think about what you can do to make that experience better.

Improvement

Too often, people confuse change with improvement. Just changing something doesn’t make it better. When you are looking at ideas for CSI activity, make sure it is a measurable improvement. Can you articulate how it will make something better and measure the before and after so you’ll know if it had the desired effect?

It doesn’t have to be a tangible improvement like cost, speed or quality; intangible improvements that make a service feel better can be just as valuable, though you still need to measure the improvement (e.g. improved customer satisfaction scores). Either way, you must be able to define the improvement. If you can’t, then it probably isn’t an improvement. It’s just a change.

So, keeping the name in mind, why not dust down that CSI process and tear up that year-old CSI log?

Start afresh and enjoy the opportunity to be truly creative.

Published by

Jane Sleight

I am a Senior Service Management Consultant at Sopra Steria and an author of romantic fiction.

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