image man asking questions

Blending Kipling with stakeholders to gain Insight Advantage

Rudyard Kipling is an unlikely candidate as a guru of Insight Advantage. But as a Nobel Laureate for Literature, he understood the role curiosity plays in firing the imagination. Both curiosity and imagination are as important now as when Kipling was at his creative peak and wrote “I keep six honest serving-men” – essentially his recipe for creativity.

In our white paper on How to Improve Business Performance with POST-Digital Capabilities, Elliot Howard, John Batchelor and I outlined the importance of customer curiosity, a term first coined by Elliot. We wrote:

“Customer curiosity extends beyond simple customer centricity, it incorporates constant focus on improving insights into customers so that why they behave as they do is as well understood as the more easily identified what, where, when and how elements of behaviour. It requires a culture of experimentation. Experiments create new data and new insights. And ultimately customer curiosity is about creating an increasingly rich data profile for each customer.”

In essence, customer curiosity boils down to asking questions – more importantly, asking the right questions. And while customers are the most important stakeholder group a business has, they are not the only one. Insight Advantage stems from curiosity about each stakeholder group – how they can be better served and gain created as a result.

The second article in my series on Insight Advantage describes how you can blend Kipling’s honest serving-men with stakeholder theory to identify the questions that you should be asking, rather than simply asking the ones that you know can be readily answered.

What do you think? Leave a comment below or contact me by email.

Published by

Jack Springman

Passionate about how deployment of digital and analytics solutions can benefit companies and their customers, employees, leadership teams (indeed all the stakeholders that a company has).