main building with lego

Five things I learned by teaching a training course “from the back of the room”

Our Agile Foundation Certificate training course is delivered using a “back of the room” approach. Almost all teaching points are taught using activities, discussions and self-authored presentations. We don’t use Powerpoint, we don’t use a screen projector. We do use internet searches, two-minute talks, Lego, balloons (with faces on them), Jenga blocks and origami.

Here’s a few things I’ve learned from delivering the course a dozen times:

  1. BOTR (“back of the room”) really works. Lugging a suitcase of Lego and Jenga up the stairs on the Tube I sometimes think it would be better to just talk to a slide deck. But the feedback that we get for our course is almost entirely positive. People seem to like it. And our pass rate is currently ninety-five percent, so they also remember and understand what they’ve learned.
  2. Showing is better than telling (especially for skeptics). We explore Agile techniques using physical activities and we encourage our delegates to research various Agile methodologies online and come back, not only with praise, but also with criticism (‘one star’ Amazon reviews of a method’s textbook are often a good place to look). This approach seems to work particularly well with people who are skeptical or unconvinced about whether an Agile approach will work for them, or for their project, or ever.
  3. People want to hear about real Agile projects. When we’re not delivering Agile training, our “day job” is working on Agile projects, maybe as ScrumMasters, maybe as Agile coaches. People really want to hear about this real-world experience. It’s a distinct advantage of using Agile practitioners to deliver the course.
  4. People take games very seriously. Even though the tasks that we set people in the training aren’t really important, people get totally absorbed. And that’s a good thing. We can use games in the training room to show important ideas in a safe (sometimes called a “safe-to-fail” environment). But it also means that if you’ve got any complex points to communicate – you should do them before you get out the Lego.
  5. Once you’ve tried BOTR – it’s hard to imagine doing it any other way. We’re now looking to develop other training courses, workshops and executive briefings using a back of the room approach. We know Agile and iterative approaches work. So when we do develop something new, we try it out at every step with real users, incorporating their feedback as we go.

If you’d like to be involved in that process – or you’d like to know more about attending our “Agile Foundation Course” please get in touch.

Published by

Mark Stringer Agile Coach

Agile Coach for Sopra Steria Ltd in the United Kingdom. I develop and deliver Agile training courses; work as an Agile Scrum Master on delivery projects and coach individuals and teams using Agile methods.

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