Come on vendors, get it together: Office 365, Google, Dropbox, etc

For many of our customers, large and small, their first foray into the beautiful world of cloud computing is driven by a less beautiful compelling event related to one of the following:

  • On-premise email servers (typically Microsoft Exchange) require an upgrade of either software, hardware or both
  • Licensing and upgrades of the Microsoft Office suite, typically as part of some enterprise-wide licensing agreement (or maybe an audit!)

So, if you are approaching a refresh, what should you do?  There’s a myriad of comparisons out there on the web comparing the features and costs of Microsoft Office 365 against Google Apps so I won’t add to that. To cut to the chase, feature-wise they are approaching parity but of course it depends on the specific requirements of your organisation. What I wanted to cover was the usual corporate dilemma, and why Microsoft is currently (and probably for a long time) the right answer.

The logic goes like this.  I really quite like the idea of using Google Apps, it’s a bit easier to administer (in my view – but partially as it’s less rich and maybe doesn’t expose all the cruft of Exchange in the config pages), it’s just feels a bit more hip and happening. Although to be fair, Microsoft have managed to shed their corporate image and loosen up a bit, as demonstrated by this identification challenge that tickled me when you are registering for Office 365…

But, I really only want to have one vendor and configuration to manage – surely I can get everything I need from one vendor in 2016?  It really depends what line of business you are in, but certainly for us as a professional services-based business some customers will expect materials to be sent to them in Microsoft Office formats (Word, Excel, PowerPoint).  Whilst other vendors can work in this format or I could use LibreOffice, I know that the interoperability just isn’t quite good enough. And my finance team are going to rebel if I don’t give them Excel, so… I really need to buy Microsoft Office – and this is when the costing dimension comes in. Pricing starts at £7.80/month/user for up to 300 users for Office 365 with the ability to download all the Office client applications (jumping to a pre-discount £14.70 for the Enterprise E3) – and that immediately makes a Google Apps-based solution unattractive as you basically have to pay for many of the services twice, e.g. email services, Skype or Hangouts etc from both Microsoft and Google.  A masterstroke of lock-in from Microsoft.

OK, so I accept this as a fact of life, and resign myself to going “all in” with Office 365.  Not so fast.  Like many organisations today, I might have a BYOD or CYOD policy and I know that my users have both PCs and Macs. That sounds fine – Office 365 supports Macs.  Yes, the Mac implementations of Word, Excel etc are a bit different (mainly as a result of the weird double menu bar thing – why have one “Insert” menu when you can have two?) but the apps are pretty good these days.

But the issue comes with file sharing and synchronisation on the Mac. Whilst there is a Mac client for syncing your OneDrive so you can work offline etc, it does not sync shared files – and so the only way you can access them is via the web interface – not something that you are going to enjoy on the train on the way home.  This fact is a little buried here – there’s more evidence of Microsoft’s sense of humour with this statement…

So that leaves us with an issue as to how to support collaborative file sharing across our organisation.  This is what Dropbox (in my experience) does best – it just works across clients.  So you end up having to have at least one other vendor product to plug this functionality gap, which is frustrating.  I was talking to a start up the other day – they are not big but they’ve active subscriptions for all three – i.e. Google Apps (as the email search is the best), Office 365 (as they need the client apps) and DropBox (for the file sharing).  I bet this is much more common than it should be.

But, it’s on Microsoft’s Office 365 roadmap so maybe I’ll be able to have just one subscription in 2017.

If you want to read more on comparisons of Google Apps and Office 365 etc – this is a great resource.


Beamap is the cloud consultancy subsidiary of Sopra Steria

Published by

Robin Meehan

Managing Director at Beamap UK - Leading and growing a business unit within Sopra Steria providing cloud computing and digital transformation advisory services to customers in the UK

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