Journey interrupted

Contrary to what you might expect, this blog isn’t a reflection of my experience with Southern Rail. Instead it’s a look to the future, inspired by the Sopra Steria Horizon Scanning Team’s trip to Wired 2016.

In our horizon scanning programme, Aurora, we try to look beyond the technologies that are shaping our future and include the behavioural and social changes that are also making an impact, and this is where Wired’s annual event fits in so perfectly with our interests. Though Wired 2016 takes no shame in celebrating the advancements we’ve seen in technology and imagining what may come next, it also takes account of wider sociological and environmental changes, such as mass migration, climate change and global conflict.

The running theme throughout was ‘journey interrupted’ which seemed both to reflect on the individual journeys of many speakers who had set out with what seemed like a clear direction, but ended up somewhere entirely different to what they had planned, but also the inevitable interruption in our unsustainable way of living which needs change more urgently than ever.

In the technology content, an overwhelmingly strong theme was data. Now, data is nothing new at these kinds of events, and has not been for years.  Data in this instance was framed most clearly in machine learning and AI, which again isn’t anything new to us, but what we’re beginning to see is how achievable it is becoming to us.  Historically the privilege of huge projects backed by a great deal of money, we’re now seeing machine learning in the hands of start-ups and individual people who are able to apply the same technology to problems which receive little or no funding, but are important none the less. Applications ranged from health, limiting the spread of Ebola and the Zika virus to cancer discovery and treatment, to migrant demographics, through to the future of AI and the singularity.

The most poignant moments in Wired 2016 however did not focus wholly on technology. They were about the big shifts happening to people and our environment. Predictions on climate change are looking more devastating than ever with even fairly conservative scientists predicting that we may go well beyond the 2C maximum limit for warming since pre-industrial weather reports, going as far as 7C which could wreak untold havoc on our world. The speakers at Wired 2016 were looking both at how we can change the way we live in the developed world to reduce our environmental impact, but also how we can curtail the impact of the developing world, ideally skipping straight to renewable power, in much the same way as they have largely missed out internet on PCs, experiencing the internet for the first time on a mobile device.  The refugee crisis was also a recurring theme, where the journey that people had set for their own lives has been completely torn apart, exploring how communities around the world have found ways for them to get their journeys back on track, through enabling their work and encouraging entrepreneurship.

The story from Wired 2016 is that if we continue on this express train, we’re heading to a bad place. We need to instead take a look at the journey we’re taking, or better still find an entirely new mode of transport to take us there. The technology is there, but the community and widespread adoption is not, and if we want success this is going to need to be a journey we take together.

What do you think? Leave a reply below, or contact me by email.

Learn more about Aurora, Sopra Steria’s horizon scanning team, and the topics that we are researching.

Published by

Ben Gilburt

I work within the Sopra Steria Horizon scanning team, identifying the topics that are likely to shape our business and the way we work in the next 3 to 5 years. Outside of work I am a keen musician. Piano is my first instrument and I am currently studying for my grade 7 exam.

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