The value of consistency in design

At Sopra Steria, the core of my role is to make everything that’s designed more consistent.

All our outputs are designed in some way, whether it’s research, documentation, bids, UI designs, diagrams, presentations or social media. Everything that’s seen by other people is part of our brand, all holding a consistent type of messaging (written or otherwise). This is especially important to consider when we are presenting to a large audience, within key sales or when we’re working with our client’s brands.

Why is design consistency important?

Recently I attended UX Scotland, where I enjoyed a talk by Andrew Purnell, a designer from the London and Glasgow based agency Snook. He shared my view that often on projects, following a consistent brand can be forgotten, with information and styles that do not look or sound like they come from the same company. This can lead to a confusing journey for whoever happens to be using the service, as screens that look and behave differently are not easy to use and do not feel connected.

This can also apply to other media or documentation. Think of two pitches that are from similar companies with a similar approach. One is written by several different authors all with a different style, and with diagrams scanned from several external sources. The other has been designed to have any image or diagram with the same branding, for the messaging to sound consistent though the authors are different. Which is more likely to hit the mark?

Design consistency reduces this confusion and creates a feeling of familiarity, providing reassurance and building trust.

Designing a consistent service

When we’re working on projects, we can think about the wide range of outputs that will come into contact with people as they use the site or system. Service design considers customer journeys from the first to the last point of contact, and takes into account all touchpoints that they may interact with, such as websites, call centres, emails, letters, social media or downloads. Will the service look and feel the same on the homepage, sign-up or email they receive?

Designing systematically

One way to increase consistency throughout each output is to implement a Design System that covers the guidelines for as many of the areas that people will see as possible, combining branding, content strategy, marketing and digital design. For a company, they can provide consistency across an entire range of touchpoints including branding, blog posts, Twitter messaging, business cards, iPhone apps, websites and email signatures. They can also include all the specific detail that makes up the site or system, such as tone of voice, imagery, colour palettes, type styles and (coded) component parts.

“Be consistent, not uniform” – Gov.uk design principles

As well as including everything that makes up the product or service, Design Systems are adaptable and easy to change, which makes them very effective across teams, and throughout a project lifecycle. They can be constantly updated and linked to the latest version of each output, so the project and ultimately the customers are always kept up to date.

To find out how we can help you to design your service consistently, please leave a reply below, or contact me by email.

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Some excellent examples of design systems:

IBM’s Carbon Design System – http://carbondesignsystem.com/

Atlassian’s Design System – https://atlassian.design/

Published by

Lydia Valtind

Visual Designer for Sopra Steria (UX Team), with an eye for detailed, delightful and intuitive designs. I like to share experience about branding, consistent styles and considered graphics, including storyboards, iconography, prototypes and polished layouts.

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