Accessibility: The path less trodden

“Diversity is the world’s biggest asset and inclusivity is our biggest challenge.”

These are the words of the renowned design researcher Jutta Treviranus, and this powerful thought was shared at the recent Accessibility Scotland 2017 conference in Edinburgh. The event was a brilliant congregation of accessibility experts, enthusiasts and advocates. The topics ranged from the fantastic new innovations from the likes of Microsoft, to accessible ideas in gaming technology. Many insightful thoughts were exchanged in great spirit, making it a highly engaging event.

One of the interesting exercises tried out at the event was to have open discussions about accessibility matters of common interest. I was involved in the one about the implications of Brexit on laws and regulation around accessibility. Amongst the various arguments we made in this connection, there was one question that we all debated intently –

Should we have a culture driven by legislation or should it be the other way round – and have legislation empowered by common culture?

If the latter, we perhaps have to invest in a strategy on how to go about it. We should be encouraging learning on these concepts early on. Hence there is a need to perhaps develop awareness about inclusivity at schools and universities. We should also be ensuring that web accessibility is included in study materials for new recruits in companies. We definitely have a long way to go in making accessibility a default feature of all our work.

It is a well-known fact now that not many countries have been very successful in making accessibility an obvious aspect in their technology domain.  This less trodden path could very well be taken by the UK, to set an example to other societies. There are innumerable charities working across the country for this cause, which reflects the amazing work done here for the disabled community. We have a great opportunity in the world of technology too to become leaders on this front. This call goes out to everyone, irrespective of working in public or private sectors, to think about the impact we can potentially make by being inclusive – in our web designs, in our programming, in our testing and above all in our attitudes.

It is ironic that people with disability were one of the early adopters of technology (like speech processors etc.) but have been left behind as the new innovations are arriving in unbelievable speed. As the famous writer William Gibson has said,

“The future has arrived but it is not evenly distributed.”

Our world today boasts of advancement in technology which is beyond imagination but it is very much our battle of the moment to make sure it is in reach for everybody.

Read more about how Sopra Steria drives digital inclusivity through improved web accessibility.

Published by

Sowmya Ramesh

Sowmya Ramesh has been with Sopra Steria for the last 7 years, currently leading an initiative for developing the topic of Accessibility Testing within the company. With over 14 years of experience in the IT consultancy / service industry, Sowmya has worked with various clients in public and private sectors. A stint at ‘Enable Scotland’, a charity supporting people with learning disabilities, gave her an opportunity to understand the needs of the disabled community and she has developed a deep interest in accessibility. She has been striving to raise awareness about this topic and hopes for it to gain more importance in the IT sphere.

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