Citizens can feel the benefits of digital public services but are concerned about the ability of government to keep pace with their needs

As companies have transformed themselves with digital technologies, citizens are calling on governments to follow suit.

By digitising, the public sector can provide services that meet the evolving needs of citizens, even in a period of tight budgets and complex challenges.

This is the second year that Sopra Steria has asked the researchers at Ipsos to conduct a survey of 1000 citizens, from a broad range of social groups and across the United Kingdom, to understand their experience of and expectations for digital government. The same survey took place in France, Germany and Norway. So we have an opportunity to compare how citizens in the UK experience digital with others across Europe.

What did we find?

Citizens expect public services to be designed and delivered in a simple and intuitive way.

This year’s research shows that citizens recognise the efforts made by governments to use digital channels to streamline their interactions. 64% of the UK citizens surveyed described digital public services as advanced, compared to just 42% in Germany, 66% in France and 75% in Norway. The UK Government should seek to learn from experience of Norway, which has long used technology to streamline processes.

We asked citizens to describe the current degree of digital service development across Government

Citizens continue to support investment in digital public services. 75% of citizens surveyed in the UK said government should press ahead with plans to digitise public services. 25% described this as ‘an absolute priority’. Health is judged the most important public service to digitise in the future. 54% of citizens in the UK said health was the priority for investment, an increase of 5% in the 12 months since the last survey.

The research found that citizens also recognise the positive impact digital is having on the quality of public services. 58% of the UK citizens surveyed said that the introduction of online channels and services had improved the quality of public services, compared to 53% in France, 65% in Norway and 57% in Germany.

So far, so good – but what about the future of digital public service delivery?

Governments are working on simplifying access through the development of simple organisational hubs for digital government services. Fully developing this approach requires governments to achieve significant levels of interoperability of public sector information systems and, at times, cross-organisational service solutions.

Citizens are cautious when asked about the prospects of making further progress. 47% of the citizens surveyed said they did not believe the public sector had the necessary skills to make progress (which is similar to our own survey of civil servants last year). And France is the only country surveyed where citizens expressed confidence in their government’s will AND ability to continue to make progress.

We asked citizens for their views on the will and ability of governments to make progress with digital public services

The UK might learn from France and other countries that are seeking to introduce incentives across the public sector to help bring down cultural barriers in hierarchical and centralised administrative cultures. And develop a human resources strategy that helps develop, attract and retain vital data skills that facilitate collaboration.

In my next blog I will be looking in more detail at why citizens are so cautious about future prospects for digital public services. And how governments can address their concerns and shift away from the ‘vending machine’ model of service delivery.

In the meantime I’d like to hear your thoughts on the survey, including great examples of digital public services and how obstacles were overcome. And get in touch if you would like further details of the survey.

Published by

Philip Craig

I am the Government Sector Strategy Director at Sopra Steria. My background is in the public (central and local government) and private (consultancy) sectors. I have an interest in public policy, technology and public service reform.

One thought on “Citizens can feel the benefits of digital public services but are concerned about the ability of government to keep pace with their needs”

  1. The UK might learn from France and other countries that are seeking to introduce incentives across the public sector to help bring down cultural barriers in hierarchical and centralised administrative cultures. And develop a human resources strategy that helps develop, attract and retain vital data skills that facilitate collaboration.

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