Digital Justice Scotland 2016: delivering 21st century justice

This year’s Holyrood Digital Justice Scotland 2016 conference held on 7 December, once again brought together some great speakers who laid out their vision and shared some of the challenges they continue to face in delivering against the objectives of the 2014 Digital Strategy for Justice in Scotland.

As one of the co-sponsors we had the opportunity to present our approach to service design and discuss with the delegates its potential in delivering improved outcomes within the justice sector. Before embarking on the interactive session, we introduced the audience to the positive impact that service design can have on an end-to-end customer experience by firstly taking them through a simple example they would all be familiar with – buying a burger.

Then we presented a high level offender journey from being convicted to release back to the community and asked the audience to highlight the gaps and risks to the business and offender in the end to end journey. Our method was very visual, we kept the user journeys simple to plant the idea of service disruption by design and we challenged the participants to focus on how offenders are interacting with services and what outcomes are needed at each stage of the journey.

Mark Macrae presents at Digital Justice Scotland 2016
Mark Macrae presents at Digital Justice Scotland 2016

The session highlighted a number of areas where digital technology could be used to improve ways of working, for example:

  • Offender self-service access to services such as money management, organising visits, buying essentials, scheduling education and work activities etc.
  • Reducing repetitive administrative tasks for Prison Officers and freeing them for more value adding face to face services for the vulnerable
  • There was also a strong theme of improving information flows, both on arrival at prison and exit back into the community.

Common Themes

Several strong common themes kept reoccurring through the day:

  • Progress on delivering the vision of the Digital Strategy for Justice has been slow since its publication in 2014. The Rt Hon Leonna Dorrian said “we need 21st century attitudes” and that “it’s not about tinkering” when considering the much needed policy and cultural changes required to transform justice processes.
  • Austerity is having a significant impact on the ability to deliver digital transformation but I believe a positive aspect of this is that it is forcing a closer look at what can be re-used within an organisation with integrated services helping to leverage current investment.
  • Empowerment is an important driver in the delivery of services for staff and victims / witnesses / offenders within justice processes. In the last session of the day Susan Gallagher (Acting Chief Exec at Victim Support Scotland) demonstrated how far they’ve come in digitally transforming the charity to be truly focused on user (victim) needs. Interesting that a charity can move so quickly compared to government organisations…

Sopra Steria’s service design approach puts the user at the heart of the process. It challenges you to examine the pain points, map out the business needs and customer expectations and identify the required outcomes. It enables you to understand what is needed to change ways of working.

If you’d like more information on our approach to service integration or service design please get in touch – leave a reply below, or contact me by email.

Fundraising for Byte Night: supporting Action for Children

One bike. Three men.

Our challenge? To cycle for 24 hours non-stop to raise money and awareness for a charity called Action for Children who support the 80,000 homeless children in the UK. On Friday 3rd August at 4pm we settled down for what was going to be a fantastic experience of tiredness, camaraderie, humour, shouting, generosity, through rain, wind and sunshine.

Back in May when I first suggested a charity cycle challenge as part of our Byte Night fundraising I couldn’t have guessed how much support we would need and receive; where do you start? Picking the team was easy as when I asked John French, Scotty Davidson who sits opposite jumped in and said “I’ll do that!” Next up, venue. Sure we could have done this in the office but that would have limited scope for donations and sounded somewhat boring.

Edinburgh is a fantastic city and every year in August the population swells so much during the Fringe and International Festivals that I thought it would give us a great opportunity to get as many people as possible to see us and donate. With the main festival venues centred around the Royal Mile which is soooo busy we decided on the West End. Busy enough but not too busy to give us any security concerns.

Next came sourcing a bike, informing the local council, clothing, posters, food, drinks, visitors (for support, security and supplies). Aside from friends and family I’ll get the thanks out of the way now. Massive thanks to:

  • Edinburgh Leisure for the spin bike
  • Brewlab for a couple of cases of water
  • Starbucks for breakfast coffee and muffins, and then more coffee and treats
  • A very kind unnamed woman who after watching us from a nearby bar for around 3 hours suddenly appeared with Big Mac Meals for the 3 of us. She’d asked the bar if she could pay them to bring us a bacon roll for breakfast but they said no – not particularly charitable of them but they will remain nameless
  • And finally to my main partners in crime John and Scotty for helping to organise and keeping us all going

And so on to the main event

After picking up the bike and my team mates we quickly set up and settled in for a long night. The weather was unkind for the first few hours with intermittent heavy rain showers but we were soon visited by colleagues leaving the office for the day. The cycling plan was to do 2 hours on the bike then swap while those off the bike shook the buckets and improved their patter. It’s amazing how quickly you lose any sense of inhibition and start shouting out for the cause to attract attention for donations.

 I don’t plan to give too much of a blow by blow account but will instead pick out what I consider some highlights :

  • During rain showers we used the weather to our advantage by shaming those sheltering in shop doorways to consider those unfortunate children who would have no such shelter overnight
  • Free coffee from a bar across the street who had no idea what we were doing but saw that we were clearly raising money for charity and had already been there for a good few hours
  • Chatting with a homeless young lad who had previously been helped by the charity and was now in a hostel which was helping him get his life back on track
  • Meeting other homeless people that had very little to their name but still offered some chat and some coppers as they know how hard homelessness is
  • Seeing the city move through a whole 24 hours from one fixed spot; this was fascinating watching it ease from early to late evening to very early morning to morning to afternoon and the different people this brought across our path. We watched and chatted to people heading out for the evening, heading home and then dropping by again in the morning just to see if we were still there!
  • Being visited by colleagues late into the night with smiles, food and supplementary shouting at passers by to spare some change
  • A young man who gave us £40 which we said was too much but he insisted as he’d apparently won £9,000 at the casino the night before!
  • Lots of children wanting to pop some change in the bucket having harangued their parents/grandparents for money to help us

24cycle_2Our fundraising target was a few hundred pounds – but we raised over £2,000!!!

What an amazing experience and what an amazing result! But what’s next?

Tonight, Friday 7 October is Byte Night and a group of us from the Edinburgh office will be sleeping out under the stars to raise more money to help fund projects and services run by Action for Children.

It’s not too late to support us – if you’d like to make a donation please visit our justgiving page: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/soprasteriateam

What crazy things have you done to fund raise for charity? Leave a reply below or contact me by email.

Lead by listening

We’re taught to listen from a very early age so why, sometimes, does it feel that c-suite executives have unlearnt this? Executives in an organisation need to be seen to be leaders, to be the people that drive forward initiatives to achieve an organisation’s desired outcomes. Traditional board structures produce a hierarchical delineation of responsibility and with that often a culture of

This is what we’re doing. I’m in control. Do it.’

With every market being disrupted in some way by technical or customer culture evolution then a c-suite leader who simply dictates runs the risk of becoming detached from those they are there to ultimately serve – their customers. Yes, we could say ‘shareholders’, but happy customers usually result in better profits – which keeps the shareholders happy.

They say knowledge is power, so if we gain knowledge from listening is it such a leap to suggest that we gain power from listening?

Knowledge = Power, Listening = Knowledge, ergo Listening = Power

Accepting my transitive relation argument as correct, then if you’re a c-suite executive who should you listen to?

Fellow board members

By understanding the needs and opinions of your peers you can better understand how your decisions affect other parts of the business. This is crucial to ensuring cross-organisational alignment and reducing the risk of introducing counter-productive initiatives; tightening one guy rope on a tent can often loosen another. It’s also important not to be too protective of your domain. If a decision elsewhere could greatly affect your area of the business, but is better for the positive growth of the organisation, then perhaps embracing the change is the better option?

Direct reports

Gaining a clear understanding of the pressures that your direct reports are under (especially where those pressures have been introduced by you) will help you understand the impact of your decisions. Better still, collaborate on decisions before setting out changes – ask your reports, ‘If we do this, what’s the direct impact?’ Greater involvement in the decision will lead to increased support in implementation.

Those at the coal face

Multi-tiered management structures often hide the main causes of business inefficiency through messages of discontent or frustration, with business processes or systems never reaching those who make the investment decisions. By getting out there and talking directly to those that deliver your day-to-day business functions you’ll quickly get to the root cause of business ‘churn’ and with open encouragement be told of the little things that could make a big difference. A simple way of doing this is asking the question ‘What’s getting in your way of delivering value here?’ Do the staff need more time with customers? More training? Less policies?

Jeanne Bliss, in her book “Chief Customer Officer”, suggests introducing a “Kill a stupid rule movement” which encourages staff to identify rules or processes that used to make sense but now, as the business has moved forward, are just getting in the way. There may not be a simple fix but this type of open communication channel can highlight issues early, leading to more cost-effective solutions.

Customers

In most businesses, this is the most important set of people to listen to as to continue to be a successful organisation you need happy customers. Some organisations fail badly here by focussing on the good interactions when there is much greater value in following up with customers who’ve had a bad experience. Acknowledgement and empathy when something has gone wrong is important to get the customer to share crucial feedback – the goal is not to win them back but to listen and adapt accordingly.

Leadership today is not just about dictating from on high. It’s about creating a culture where everyone in the organisation feels that they contribute and have a voice. Time is up for the autocrat, we’re now in the time of the listening leader.

Let me know what you think. Leave a comment below, or contact me by email.

Digital Justice in the near future

What might the justice system look like in 2020?

Here’s a fictional example of the digital technology that could be used to manage cases…

“The police are called to a shoplifting case in a local supermarket. In the process of trying to leave the premises with stolen goods the accused allegedly assaults a security guard before being held awaiting the police. He has no ID on him and is reluctant to give his name. The police officer uses an app on his smart radio which carries out a facial recognition check to attempt to confirm his identity. The smart radio receives an instant response from the central justice hub with a photo match and informs the police officer of the accused’s full name and address and that he has an outstanding fine payment from a previous offence. Before the police leave the shop they review and upload some CCTV evidence to the central justice hub and attach it to the electronic police report they’ve created on the spot. The police report is sent directly to the Crown Office case marking queue for them to decide how to proceed. After escorting the accused to the local police station their work on this case is complete. As they arrive at the police station a notification has already been received from the Crown office that the accused can be released on conditional bail. After being informed of the bail conditions and electronically signing his acceptance the accused is free to leave.

Fast forward to a Skype meeting between the accused, sitting in a private booth in his local library, and his defence lawyer, sitting in his office. The defence lawyer has direct access to the CCTV footage which clearly shows his client stealing from the shop but only partially shows the alleged assault. They decide they’re ready to proceed to a trial.

Fast forward to the day of the trial. The presiding judge arrives at court and checks his case management work queue. He has three cases to hear in the morning but attends to other business as the live attendance dashboard informs him that none of the cases have all their attendees in the court building yet.

The defence lawyer has already checked in electronically at the court and is concerned that his client is not present. One of his client’s bail conditions was to allow his phone location to be tracked and when his defence lawyer checks this via the central justice hub he sees that his client is two streets away from the court house. Two minutes later he receives a notification on his smart phone that his client has arrived and has been checked in automatically based on his proximity to the court house reception. As everyone is now present, the judge receives a notification in his work queue to indicate that one of his three cases is now ready to proceed. He updates the case record to notify the accused, his defence lawyer, Crown prosecution representative and the single witness that the case will commence in 5 minutes.

As the trial actors enter the court room the judge briefly reviews the case file summary on his screen. The accused has, prior to the trial date, accepted that he is guilty of shop lifting but denies assaulting the security guard and the judge sees that this is the only relevant point to be debated.

A short while later the judge decides that the accused is not guilty of assault and issues a fine for the shop lifting offence and orders the offender to agree a payment plan to pay his previous and new fine before leaving the court house. The court is cleared as the judge notices on his work queue that all participants in another of the two remaining morning cases are now in attendance and are ready to be called. This time he issues a 15-minute notification to allow him to complete and close his first case file.

As our offender has a mobile phone he agrees a 12-month instalment payment plan to be paid via his mobile phone bill. He also accepts that his location will remain trackable until the final payment is made. He has the choice to pay the balance or more than the monthly payment at any time via the courts mobile website. As soon as the fine balance is clear his location will no longer be trackable.”

So what are the benefits?

Easy access to data that enables and supports the process

  • identity assurance – we quickly know exactly who we are dealing with
  • early access to case data – e.g. CCTV evidence may result in earlier pleas and fewer cases going to court
  • previous convictions – a more holistic view of the offender

Offender tracking

  • tracking can be used to monitor current, and predict future trends
  • soft sanctions that may help reduce re-offending

More efficient court scheduling

  • less time wasted waiting for cases to proceed as they are called in the order of availability meaning all case actors have an incentive to turn up on time (this is already happening in Malaysia)
  • more control placed in the hands of the presiding judge

Greater visibility and control of collecting fine payments

  • new payment channels reduce volume of desk or phone payments with more accurate, automatic reconciliation
  • additional payment channels for those who may not have a bank account

But there are challenges…

  • greater data sharing trust needed between justice organisations
  • creation of shared infrastructure to host centralised resources
  • potential changes to legislation e.g. to allow location data to be gathered and stored

Do the benefits outweigh the challenges? I think so, but what do you think? Leave a reply below, or contact me by email.

Softening the big bang

Change is good! Poorly communicated change is bad…

How often have you been in a situation where a business change has been forced upon you, has been presented as a fait accompli? How did it make you feel? Included? Receptive? Positive? Ready to run with it?

Probably not.

By its nature a digital transformation project will have an impact on a lot of people, processes and technology. So how do we communicate change in a way that feels less of a “sucker punch”? Some of the terminology we use doesn’t necessarily help. Look again at the first sentence of this paragraph where I use the word impact.

impact

noun

1. the striking of one thing against another; forceful contact; collision:

The impact of the colliding cars broke the windshield.

Do we want to break the people, processes or technology? Erm, no. We talk of “big bang” implementations. That phrase also raises stress levels. Just because a change needs to be implemented in a short timescale doesn’t mean that it will be stressful, out of control, badly planned, a failure.

Planning change is important. Communicating change is paramount to success

So what techniques can we use to manage the successful communication and buy-in needed for a programme of work to be understood, well received and, dare I say it, applauded?

Don’t be afraid to share

With many modern development projects taking advantage of alternative methods of delivery – for example Agile, which encourages open communication, collaboration and working towards the “common goal” – those teams working well together is key to the successful delivery of the project or product. However, it is equally important to share the knowledge, successes and, potentially, failures to a wider business and technical community.

Early and frequent communication can be used to generate a “buzz” around the delivery simply by showing/informing those that will be affected by the change how progress is being made and how their working life will be improved by the transformation. I’d even go as far as to suggest that some employees will be excited by the difference it may make to their customer’s lives: for example, introducing a mobile case management solution to a social worker that reduces the time needed to update notes while offering a more secure way of carrying or accessing case information, may result in less stress about case file security and generate more time in their day to have higher quality face to face meetings with clients.

Some ideas for information sharing:

  • Expanded ‘show & tells’ – a key part of the Agile methodology is to host regular sessions where the latest features of the product are demoed to the product owner (the project’s main business representative). These can be extended to include wider stakeholders or end users who may bring some valuable critique to the process
  • Programme highlight dashboard – where highlight reporting is generated for key stakeholders, is there really much additional effort needed to pick out key information that can be shared with the entire business?
  • Corporate Social Media – do you have an internal collaboration site, for example Yammer? Set up a programme-specific group and ask the team members to post updates on milestones met, challenges overcome, etc.
  • Don’t forget the traditional channels – these could include notice boards or paper flyers even if they’re simply used to point people to an online medium

Identify your digital champions

Sharing information using traditional or modern methods is one thing but identifying people that can talk about the project with knowledge and enthusiasm can be a great way to disseminate information virally through their existing networks. We call these people ‘digital champions’:

Digital champions inform and inspire people to embrace business transformation

Identification of these people can be a challenge in itself but introducing and then nurturing an open channel where the programme team encourages anyone to come and visit the team at work, ask questions or to attend the ‘show & tells’ should help draw out those who are genuinely interested. It’s important not to assume that you know who your best advocates will be. Traditional programme structures may put communications responsibility at the door of senior managers or business stakeholders. I would agree that they have their part to play, but if you’re a front line employee hearing someone enthuse about an upcoming business change, you may listen more intently to a colleague than a senior manager.

Do something!

Whatever method of communication you settle on isn’t as important as making sure you do something to educate, inform, and inspire those immediately and peripherally affected by change.

“Knowledge is power. Information is liberating. Education is the premise of progress, in every society, in every family” – Kofi Annan

Don’t we all feel better when we know more about a subject? Let me hear your thoughts by posting a comment below.

Is your jar full yet?

If you’ve never read the “Is your jar full?” story that describes a philosophy lecture a professor delivers to his students, then do take two minutes to read it…  otherwise I may lose you.

It’s an interesting take on fitting the important things into your life but I’d like to turn it on it’s head and re-use the story for another purpose; to describe how to ensure your business transformation programme delivers value.

Let’s think of the planned jar contents as follows (MoSCoW method):

Golf balls – must have deliverables
Pebbles – should have deliverables
Sand – could have deliverables

Our vision statement being “We will fill the jar.”

The students would argue that when you can’t fit in any more golf balls the jar is full and therefore the project vision has been met.

We know this is not the case and that the reality is that it will be a combination of all three BUT when delivering any business transformation project it’s important to not lose sight of what you’re aiming to achieve. I see clients get lost in the detail and, as a colleague puts it, they “look at the bonnet, not at the road ahead”. Some start-ups are a good example of getting stuck tweaking and tailoring until they find they’ve either

a) missed their market time window
b) “perfected” a product that no-one actually needs or wants

Both can be a death knell.

If you’re not careful the same can happen within the scope of your programme.

Trying to fill the jar with sand could be an endeavour that takes you past the point of delivering your vision when all you needed to do was get to the golf ball or pebble stage.

This highlights a key stage in planning which is to determine how to measure success before, or at least early, in the programme.

Including checkpoint reviews against your success measures will mean that you’ll be clear when you’ve reached the “good enough”stage at which point any changes must be considered for the business value they deliver.

I’m not saying you don’t want some sand in your jar but it’s important to understand the value it will deliver.

So what about the beer? I agree with the professor, there’s always time for a couple of beers and what better way to celebrate the delivery of your vision?

What do you think? Leave a reply below or contact me by email.