Relevant or obsolete? The role of HR in the 21st century

by Claudia Quinton, Head of Workplace Transformation

The workplace is changing rapidly. Digital is transforming both how employees work and the way in which they expect to engage with their employers’ HR services. At Sopra Steria, we’ve recently partnered with Management Today on a survey that looked at the extent to which companies are using digital (data analytics, artificial intelligence, automation) to deliver a more consumer-like employee experience. And the findings don’t bode particularly well for the future of the HR function.

That’s because HR appears to be way off the curve when it comes to all things digital. For example, two thirds of CEOs and directors responding to our survey acknowledged that they had not yet fully implemented HR task automation and self-service technology in their organisations. Yet today’s employees – and not just Millennials – increasingly expect employers to make it easy for them to engage with HR how and when they want to (booking leave from home, whilst on the move, hot desking, etc.) and this can only be enabled with greater automation and digitalisation.

In search of flexibility

In fact, our survey found that greater flexibility and career development were the most likely to enhance employee experience. And the better the employee experience, the more productive and loyal an organisation’s workforce will be. Yet half of all managers and non-managerial staff told us in our survey that they had zero access to HR processes on their mobile devices. And only 4 in 10 non-managers – largely Millennials – said they believed that employees would be fully connected and operationally mobile in the next three years.

Taking this a step further, I find myself asking why so few business leaders have still not correlated a positive employee experience with greater automation? Is greater automation perhaps viewed as a threat, rather than an enabler, with concerns that robots will take people’s jobs outweighing the fact that robotic process automation can free up HR professionals from mundane, repetitive process activities? What I do know is that, with far more traction for improving employee/user experience and engagement, the tide is turning.

Connecting the modern workforce

I explore this in a new opinion paper digging deeper into the survey findings. In it I write, “by not embracing the technology that will connect and enable the modern workforce and free up HR for more strategic activity, the role of HR as a business partner could be obsolete, sooner rather than later. Indeed, being slow in the uptake of new, enabling technologies could well be the demise of the HR function as we know it”.

So, my question to all HR leaders is ‘do you want to remain relevant or become obsolete’?

For more on this, read my opinion paper ‘How can HR stay relevant in the 21st century?’

Digital Inclusion: You hold the keys to IT literacy

by Andy Robinson, Change Manager

During Sopra Steria’s Community Matters Week, held every October, my colleagues and I used our company volunteering time to provide an IT Gadget Surgery at Pinner Library in the London Borough of Harrow. The objective was to share basic IT skills with members of the local community. When we arrived at the library we were greeted with open arms by the library staff – some of whom had already brought in their own laptops so we could help them – as well as regular library users!

The lost generation and Radio Harrow

A journalist from the local radio station interviewed my colleagues Darren Kampta and Jutta Fischer. The interview was part of a report explaining how older people are having difficulty keeping up with changing technology and how companies like Sopra Steria can help. It’s a well-known fact that a lot of people, particularly the elderly, are losing touch with modern life and modern ways of socialising due to technology. The digital divide and digital exclusion are names given to the gap in terms of usage of information and communication technology (ICT)[1].

 The government’s Digital Inclusion Task Force has estimated that 6 million people in the UK (13%) are both socially and digitally excluded[2]. This has been proven to cause economic and social inequality, as 90% of jobs in the UK now require basic IT literacy[3]. From this research it is clear that having a basic understanding of IT and current technology is becoming more and more necessary in order to be a functioning member of today’s society.

It’s a small world

The most memorable person I helped was an older gentleman who had come prepared with a long list of issues he had with his laptop. One by one we crossed off the items and he noted down how to resolve the issue for future use. During the time I spent with him, I discovered we had a common interest in badminton. He had coached badminton up to England international level and it turned out one of the people he had coached, a former international player, was my badminton coach (and friend) from university. It was a great feeling knowing that I was now helping some who had indirectly influenced my life.

The Surgery

 The tasks brought to our team of five IT surgeons differed in complexity. These ranged from attaching a photo from a digital camera to an email and sending it, to fixing Microsoft Licencing issues. We were very happy with the uptake and there was barely a moment we weren’t busy! By the end of the day we’d helped tens of people with their technology queries. Although the tasks may have appeared simple to us, they could make a real difference to their lives by enabling them to share memories with their families, stay connected with their friends, or even to stay safe online. The day taught me to be patient when it comes to teaching people these new skills that perhaps aren’t as obvious to them as they are to us. I became much better at breaking down my explanations into logical steps and realised that in order for learning to take place, I had to get them doing the task themselves. The Pinner Library staff asked us if we would do something like this again in the future. We unanimously agreed that we would like to be involved in a project such as this again.

Community Matters Week 2017 at Harrow Council

Our time at the library was but one of dozens of charitable events undertaken by Sopra Steria staff as part of the company-wide Community Matters Week – one week every year focused on making a positive impact for our communities and charities around the UK. Other activities included The Marathon Challenge – a charity race against Harrow staff, The Barber Shop – two charity head shaves, Wear It Pink (People In Need of Kindness) day and the highly successful Harrow Bake Off/Bake Sale. Our team raised £2,340 for charity – one half of this went to The Mayors Special Appeal – this year it’s Harrow Women’s Centre and Harrow Law Centre, with the other half going to MacMillan Cancer Research.

Lessons learned

 I found that the volunteering at Pinner Library was highly rewarding. I felt as though I had really made a difference to the confidence of several people who had been struggling with technology. All five of us predicted prior to the day that we would mostly be helping older people, and the reasons are obvious: schools and workplaces now teach a basic level of IT literacy which their generation missed out on. Most of us take these skills for granted but we are surrounded by technical devices in everyday life and it is now essential for our social circles. The government’s Digital Inclusion Strategy has an aim to get everyone who can be digitally able, online by 2020[2]. After volunteering myself, this is a topic I now feel much more strongly about, and I will play my part to make sure digital inclusion is possible within the UK.

See more information about Sopra Steria’s work with communities.

References:

[1] 21st Century Challenges, 2013. What is digital divide.

[2] Gov.uk, 2014. Government digital inclusion strategy.

[3] Hilbert, M., 2013. Technological information inequality as an incessantly moving target: The redistribution of information and communication capacities between 1986 and 2010. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology., I(65), p. 821–835.

Regulation and compliance: the new certainties in life

by Miles Elliott, Director of Credit Risk

Benjamin Franklin once wrote that ‘in this world nothing can be said to be certain except death and taxes’. But in these more modern times, especially for financial services organisations – we should perhaps add ‘regulation and compliance’ to the list. In 2018, a wave of new regulation is being introduced – and one of the most far reaching is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

GDPR: are you ready…?

From 25 May 2018, organisations across Europe will have to strengthen controls associated with collecting, managing and using personal data. Resulting activity will see significant changes to IT systems as well as the way organisations engage with their customers.

There’s less than a year to go until GDPR becomes a way of life, but a survey in May 2017 suggested that only 10% of organisations have mature GDPR plans in place – with a further 40% at an intermediate phase.

That leaves half of organisations at the beginning of their compliance journey – and the clock is ticking!

GDPR: the cost of non-compliance…

Becoming fully GDPR compliant will be challenging and will require a holistic approach to data management and governance. Organisations run the risk of failing to respond to the scope of activity involved and the amount of time needed to ensure compliance. Another common issue is the lack of skills and experience to deliver such a comprehensive change to governance controls across a business. To put this into context, in 2016 alone there were 1.4 billion data breaches across the industry.

Fines for failing to comply with GDPR are expected to be highly penal as well as leading to material reputational damage.

Don’t go it alone – work with an expert in assured compliance

So what should today’s hard-pressed organisations do, especially if they don’t understand the full extent of GDPR?  The answer is to work with an organisation like Sopra Steria that’s got a track record in complex data management AND offers a ‘comprehensive’ approach to GDPR compliance. Our pragmatic ‘think, build and run’ approach empowers organisations to pick and choose the path to GDPR compliance that is right for them. As experts in Data, Analytics and Technology, we can help you quickly identify data gaps and risks, work with you to develop remediation solutions and support you moving forward with on-going compliance monitoring.

The clock is ticking…

So don’t get caught out! Make sure you aren’t one of the 50% of companies still asking “What is this GDPR”?  Take your first steps today to GDPR compliance and get fully prepared for the 2018 deadline. Remember, 2018 is the year of new regulation – make sure it’s a happy one!

See more information about how we can help you get compliant.

Get in touch to discuss how to meet your GDPR challenge and support your journey to assured compliance.

Why regulatory compliance offers a win-win situation

by Tej Sembi, Business Development Sopra Steria

A number of scandals in recent years, like the flawed reporting of hip replacement devices leading to huge compensation payouts and fines, suggest that the medical device industry has a problem. Do the big players really care? Well, with the work we have been doing shows that all concerned in this industry do care – patient safety is their number one concern.

The world of regulation is changing and catching up with technology. New standards and medical device directives are being introduced worldwide – from the US, to the UK, Europe and beyond. These make it clear that the industry must behave more responsibly. For example, ISO 13485 2016 extends the previous edition of the quality management system requirements for medical devices and risk.

A driver for differentiation

While this is clearly great news for the end user, there is also another positive outcome from these changes. I believe new regulatory regimes present a fantastic opportunity for medical device and implant companies to radically change the way they use and interpret product data to provide business benefit. In fact, with the right mindset, they represent a driver for differentiation and increased competitiveness.

Let me explain. Companies have to comply with the legislation, which means that they are committed to spending in this area, so does it not make sense to maximise this investment?  The data will need to be collated and managed, so why not look at how it is also used by other business areas and tap into this much underused resource?

On average, companies are said to base decisions on around 20% of available data so what could be achieved if they could harness more? These untapped sources of data contain a whole myriad of information.  Complying with the new regulations will give companies the opportunity to have better visibility and control over clinical outcomes and supporting data which could be used across the organisation to enhance patient safety, improve portfolio management, and improve sales and marketing alongside its vital role of compliance.

Reducing exposure to risk

Ultimately the right solution to the compliance challenge should deliver a better understanding of  customer/patient needs and outcomes, gaining clarity of validation, verification and design activities and support the prediction of product lifecycles in terms of maintenance, performance, end-of-life and potential usage-based issues or damage.

The more an organisation knows about each of these areas of its business, the better able it will be to reduce the company’s exposure to litigation, improve operational efficiencies and sales opportunities and, crucially, enhance product development and patient outcomes.

Thus, regulatory compliance becomes a win-win situation all round: healthcare providers have confidence in the efficacy of the medical devices they procure, patients trust that the devices they depend on are safe and robust and manufacturers gain the customer and product insight they need to differentiate and protect their brand reputation.

What do you think, am I mad to suggest compliance is really an opportunity? Leave a reply below, or contact me by email, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

How deep learning is advancing AI in leaps and bounds

by Michel Sebag, Digital Practice, Sopra Steria France

Nature has given human beings an amazing ability to learn. We learn complex tasks, like language and image recognition from birth and continue throughout our lives to modify and build upon these first learning experiences. It seems natural then, to use the concept of learning, building up knowledge and being able to model and predict outcomes and apply that to computer related processes and tasks. The terminology used to describe the technologies involved in this paradigm in computing are Artificial Intelligence (AI).

It’s just a game

In the late 1990s, a defining moment in the world of artificial intelligence happened. In 1996 chess master Garry Kasparov played IBM’s Deep Blue, originally built to play chess using a parallel computer system, and won 4-2. A year later, Kasparov and Deep Blue played another match – this time, Deep Blue won. This win created a sea-change in the attitude towards the idea of AI. Chess masters minds have to perform highly complex calculations, evaluating multiple moves and strategies, on-the-fly. They can also take their own learning and apply novel moves. Being able to mimic this process, even if applied to a specific task like chess, opens up real potential for the technology.

Out of this success, new developments in AI have brought us to the point of maturity and sophistication. DeepMind, now owned by Google, uses deep learning algorithms. These algorithms are based on the same idea that allows human beings to learn, i.e. neural pathways or networks. Again, AI has been applied to gaming to prove a point. DeepMind has taken the idea of ‘human vs. machine’ and this time used it in the highly complex game of ‘Go’. DeepMind, the company, describe the game of Go as having “more possible positions in Go than there are atoms in the universe”. So then, this is the perfect challenge for an AI technology. DeepMind uses deep learning algorithms to train itself against known plays by expert players. The resultant system is known as AlphaGo and has a 99.8% win rate when pitted against other Go programs, and has recently won 4 out of 5 games against the Go pro player, Lee Sedol.

It may seem that it’s just a game being played, but in fact, this is proving the technology, showing it can learn how to model and predict outcomes in much the same way that a human being does. In almost 20 years AI is already 10 years ahead of what was anticipated of the technology. The games have proven the capability and now the technology is entering a stage of maturity where it is being applied to more real-world problem solving. Following the AlphaGo success, Google has understood the benefits of these technologies and has promptly integrated AlphaGo technology in its cloud based Google Machine Learning Platfom.

Some definitions in the world of Artificial Intelligence

At this juncture, it is worth looking at some of the terminology and definitions of AI technology.

It can be viewed as this: Deep Learning is a sub-set of Machine Learning; Machine learning is a sub-set of Artificial Intelligence.

Artificial Intelligence: This is a general term to describe a technology that has been built to demonstrate a similar intelligence level to a human being when solving a problem. It may, or may not use biological constructs as the underlying basis for its intelligent operations. Artificial Intelligence systems typically are trained and learn from this training.

Machine Learning: In the case of the games we used earlier as examples, machine learning is trained using player moves. In learning the moves and strategies of players, the system builds up knowledge in the same way a human being would. Machine learning based systems can use very large datasets as training input, which they then use to predict outcomes. Machine learning based systems can use both classical and non-classical algorithms. One of the most valuable aspects of machine learning is the ability to adapt. Adaptive learning gives better accuracy of predictions. This, in turn, facilitates the handling of all possibilities and combinations to provide the optimal outcome from the incoming data. In the case of game playing, this results in more wins for the machine.

Deep Learning: This is a sub-set of machine learning, a type of implementation of machine learning. The typology of the system is vital; when learning, it’s not so much about ‘big’ but it’s more about the surface area or depth. More complex problems are solved by larger numbers of neurons and layers. The network is used to train a system, using known question and answers to any given problem and this creates a feedback loop. Training results in weighted outcomes, this weight being passed to the next neuron along to determine the output of that neuron – in this way, it builds up a more accurate outcome based on probabilities.

Real world applications of AI

We’ve seen the use of AI in gaming, but what about real-world commercial applications? Whenever it comes to predict, forecast, recognize, clustering, AI is being used in a multitude of processes and systems.

At Sopra Steria, for example, we use AI components in industry solutions, including banking and energy. We are integrating Natural Language Processing (NLP) and voice recognition capabilities from our partners’ solutions such as IBM Watson or Microsoft Cortana. NLP, voice recognition – and image recognition in a near future – are now widely used and integrated in a multitude of applications. For example, for banking industry, text and voice recognition are used in qualification assistants for helpdesk and customer care services. More generally, some of the best-known modern applications include everyday use in our smart phones. Voice and personal assistance technologies like Siri and Google Now brought AI into the mainstream and out of the lab, using AI and predictive analytics to answer our questions and plan our days. Siri now has a more sophisticated successor named VIV. VIV is based on self-learning algorithms and its topology is much deeper that SIRI’s more linear pathways. VIV is opening up major opportunities for developers by creating an AI platform that can be called upon for a multitude of tasks. Google recently announced a similar path to its widely acclaimed assistant Google Now becoming Google Assistant.

Machine Learning is also used in many back-end processes, such as the scoring required to allow things like bank loans and mortgages. Machine learning is used in banking to specifically offer personalization of products giving banks using this method a competitive edge.

Deep learning is being used in more complex tasks, ones where rules are fuzzier and more complex. The era of big data is providing the tools that are driving the use cases for deep learning. We can see applications of deep learning in anything related to pattern recognition, such as facial recognition systems, voice assistance and behavioral analysis for fraud prevention.

Artificial Intelligence is entering a new era with the help of more sophisticated and improved algorithms. AI is the next disruptive technology – many of Gartner’s predictions for technology into 2016 and beyond, was based on AI and machine learning. Artificial Intelligence holds the keys to those unsolvable issues, the ones we thought only human beings could do. Ultimately, even the writing of this article may one day, be done by a machine.

What are your thoughts? Leave a reply below, or contact us by email.

Building the contact centres of the future

by Bernard Gissler & Ernest Gbehi, Sopra Steria France

The boom in digital technology (smartphones, tablets, internet of things, etc.) results in an increase in remote communication channels between customers and companies. Customer behaviour becomes almost compulsive to get a satisfactory answer in real time, regardless of the request made to customer services. Companies need to constantly rethink their positioning. How should they prepare themselves for future changes? What strategies should be implemented? How will future customer relationships be integrated into these business strategies? How will current contact centres, which are the pillars of customer relationships, evolve in order to address these changes? Two things are certain: technology will continue to evolve and customers will be increasingly more demanding.

How will a contact centre of the future look?… Let’s go back to the future

This question results in a different answer depending on the person asked.
For some, contact centres will become organisations in which processes will be fully automated and “robots” will do the work of humans. The organisation will be perfect, faultless and completely self-managed to satisfy all types of customer demands at any moment. In this way, humans will be confined to non-automated tasks or tasks without high value-added, so as not to “spoil” the fluidity and efficiency of the processes in place.

In our vision of this future, “robots” will not replace agents in contact centres (except with regard to opening hours, low value-added tasks, etc.).

The agents in place will have more advanced skills and will be immersed in a highly digital culture.

These future agents from generation Y and Z, who were born and raised to “be” digital, are extremely comfortable with the technology and are multi-taskers. Thanks to their DNA, these generations naturally have the ability to switch from one application to another or to find information quickly. They will be able to simultaneously manage, for a single customer, interactions from various channels or interactions with several customers over a single channel.

The communication channels available to agents will be considerably more developed, in line with technologies on the market, at least at the same level as the customer’s equipment.

A new generation of agents, digitization of processes, use of data interpretation tools in real-time … all of this will enable companies to anticipate customer needs.

On the other hand, contact centres will be extended and fully virtualized with the development of “home agents”, who will be capable of working from anywhere and able to be activated on request.

“Home agents” will experience a serious boom, as they enable very significant savings to be made.

Internet of Things: an ENORMOUS volume of interactions to supervise

A multitude of interactions from both customers (humans) but also, and above all, machines (as is the case of connected objects) will have to be dealt with by contact centres.

A transformation already adopted by trailblazers and which will continue to grow

In the digital age, customers have more decision-making power and the ability to discredit even the biggest of companies through comments and hashtags #. Customer services are a key way to differentiate between (offers made by) companies. Contact centres must therefore be positioned at the heart of the customer relationship and e-reputation strategy.

How can we prepare them to meet the needs of tomorrow’s customers?

The first transformation to take place relates to the tools available to agents and customers. It is no longer acceptable for agents to be obliged to “juggle” between several applications before obtaining valuable information to deal with customer requests.

  • What is the last interaction with the customer, taking all channels into account?
  • What was the customer’s experience?
  • Is there any important information that the agent should know about the customer?

Agents must be able to quickly access relevant information in order to be proactive and be different. It is important to keep in mind one basic thing: to offer a seamless customer experience, the agents’ interfaces must be accessible and fluid with up-to-date information available for all channels. The customer must have a 360° view of products and services.

In 2015, only 17% of companies offered a consistent response between several channels (email/Chat, Facebook and Twitter). In the future, companies will have to offer fully omnichannel solutions as a minimum. To achieve this, companies should already have implemented mix-channel solutions as a minimum.

Surveys show that we are still falling far short of the mark. Proposing an offer of readable, coherent, omnichannel services must provide a 360° view of customers and vice versa. This transformation requires old architectures to be abandoned in silos for the benefit of architectures more suited to the current digital revolution. The 2nd transformation concerns customer interfaces. They must be smart, rich and accessible at any moment in a secure manner.

The customer journey will be more fluid thanks to innovative interfaces, capable of incorporating the latest technological developments (video, voice biometrics, social networks, geolocation, cognitive science, etc.).

Some companies have already started this transformation. This is the case for Sopra Steria who launched a prototype of a virtual assistant with IBM Watson Artificial Intelligence tools. Thanks to conversation analysis, the prototype makes it possible to capture information about the customer and how they use products and services. It also retranscribes the conversation in order to:
• Offer an advisor a qualification
• Highlight the management application (or action) responding to the context
• Go further with extended services. It reveals the dialogue with a virtual advisor up to the use of internal banking production services.

The integration of smart intelligence and increased intelligence in self-services will improve their performance and make them able to continually learn and therefore adapt to even the most complex customer demands.

These highly evolved tools know how to stand back, when necessary, to give way to human involvement providing added value.

In our vision of the future, accident reports will no longer exist. In fact, vehicles will be able to send information from their black boxes to the owner’s insurance company.

In the event of an accident, insured parties will exchange information with their insurers (contact centres) orally but also, and above all, using geolocation tools, on-board videos in smartphones, etc. To monitor these transformations, tools must be implemented in order to use the masses of customer information in real and non-real time.

New indicators such as the quality level of customer experience (and therefore its measurement) must be defined and implemented.

To conclude, we are only seeing the first signs of how tomorrow’s remote customer relations are transforming. These strategic transformations will impact all organisations at every level.

What are your thoughts? Leave a reply below or contact us by email.

Biometrics: the death of the password?

by James Holt, Senior Consultant, Financial Services

Passwords… passwords have been around since the dawn of computing, and used even before then to allow or prevent access. The concept of a password is simple but the more our personal data is moved online, the more value this shared secret protects. In the early days of the internet, a password might have granted you access to a simple message board, but now passwords protect vast databases of your personal information: from family photos to medical records, via bank accounts and cloud storage.

Passwords… upon reading that word your brain probably jumped to fussy sign-up screens asking for an inane combination of special characters, numbers and letters, with requirements differing from website to website. You probably thought back to countless password resets and security questions which could be bypassed with a quick Google search. We have been told we shouldn’t use the same password for multiple sites, but we do. Companies mandate a password change for employees every few months, with the same stringent requirements each time.

So what do we do? We make patterns, we reuse or – whisper it – we write down. All behaviours which might make life easier for us but which circumvent the very thing complicated password requirements are trying to create – security.

In their current form, passwords give the illusion of security; it is something we know, something we are familiar with. The starred out field cloaking our favourite sports team, the asterisks covering our last holiday destination. But what else is that field hiding… it is hiding an uncomfortable truth – passwords are hard for us to remember, but easy for computers to guess.

Hackers can attempt to crack passwords using dictionary words and previously leaked passwords to speed up the process. To make matters worse, most passwords are not unique – from a survey by SplashData in 2015 the most popular were “123456” and “password”.

Even if a strong password is chosen, advances in computing power mean they can be cracked in a diminishing period of time. We are playing into the hands of the hackers. But there is another way, a better way…

Biometric authentication is the process of controlling access using something you are: something you always carry with you and something that is unique to you. This could be your face, your voice or your fingerprint, or a combination of these.

Signing in using a biometric identifier is quick, taking a second or two. This is especially relevant in a mobile environment, where typing out a password on a small or virtual phone keyboard can often be slow and inaccurate. Biometrics also offer flexibility to the user – different identifiers can be used in different situations. You wouldn’t want to use voice recognition on a crowded train, and you wouldn’t be able to use face recognition in a darkened room, so by offering multi-modal biometrics, the user can stay secure without any inconvenience.

Multifactor authentication is the process of using more than one identifier to log-in. This is often implemented as a password plus a one-time code sent to your device. This approach significantly improves security and is increasingly being adopted by online services and corporations. Biometrics can integrate perfectly into this multi-factor approach – with a biometric being either the primary or secondary authentication factor. In addition, thanks to the speed of the biometric authentication process, customers could be asked to ‘step-up’ security to perform certain functionality. For example, a customer could log-in to online banking using a 4 digit PIN, which would provide only simple functionalities: the account balance and last transactions. However, to make a payment or set up a new payee, the customer could be prompted for a fingerprint, voice or face sample to provide the required additional security.

A customer’s biometric can also be combined with behavioural analytics to further strengthen security. Behavioural analytics takes user metadata like location and typical log-in times to determine the likelihood that an action is genuine. But more on that in another post…

Biometric authentication has applications beyond simple integration into a mobile application. A voice recognition function could be introduced in a call centre environment to verify customers before they are put through to an advisor, removing the need for lengthy security questions. This technology is smart too: analysing different aspects of a customer’s voice – pitch, emphasis, pronunciation, even throat and mouth shape. In addition, this technology can detect if the caller is speaking under duress or panic. It can be implemented in a passive and non-intrusive way – a customer is authenticated in the background whilst having their conversation with an advisor.

Biometric technology also has a significant use-case for authorising online payments. Currently, just knowing the card details can be enough to defraud a consumer, with a ‘3D Secure’ password prompt like SecureCode (MasterCard) and Verified by Visa only happening in certain situations. According to a MasterCard survey of 10,000 people, 53 percent of shoppers forget crucial passwords more than once a week, losing more than 10 minutes while they reset their accounts. As a result, more than a third of people abandon an online purchase, while 60% said that having to reset a password led to missing a time-sensitive transaction like buying concert tickets. More than half of people want to see passwords replaced by something more convenient, but which still delivers the same levels of protection and peace of mind.

As verifying your identity using a biometric is so quick, it is a natural fit for online transactions. Furthermore, with many modern phones featuring biometric hardware such as a fingerprint sensor, consumers are already comfortable with the process. MasterCard has recently announced their ‘IdentityCheck’ app which authenticates payments using either facial or fingerprint biometrics. Pilots in August last year proved successful with a global rollout happening early 2017.

When new technology reaches consumers, is it often adopted by the young, tech-savvy demographic who are more accustomed to learning abstract interfaces and complex operations. However, with biometrics, the process is intuitive and simple, making life easier whatever your age group or background. There is also the equality and accessibility angle – biometric identifiers provide options for those who are unable to remember passwords or struggle to type on their mobile devices.

If the user experience is slick and easy, customers are more likely to use a service and access it more frequently. With registration/signup commonplace on many websites, users have lots of passwords to remember: this represents a substantial opportunity for a biometric authentication solution.

At the end of 2014, USAA – a Fortune 500 company – offered biometric authentication to 1.4 million customers and by October of the following year, over 1 million had registered to use it. Their headline statistic shows how popular the option has become – 80% of customers have now chosen to authenticate using a biometric identifier over a PIN.

User expectations of banking are changing. Consumers expect functionality to be available using mobile apps, without the need for traditional, face-to-face banking. Security guards and vaults provide peace of mind in the physical world, but maintaining security in the digital world is more challenging. Biometrics provide the means, the assurances and the simplicity for better authentication, safeguarding our future.

What do you think?  Leave a reply below or contact James by email.

Read more about Sopra Steria’s Biometrics offering.