Three things I learned volunteering for The Prince’s Trust

 Sopra Steria is a proud Patron of
The Prince’s Trust – a UK youth charity that helps 13 to 30 year olds get into jobs, education and training.  We encourage our employees to be volunteers for The Trust to help run and lead programmes that inspire and empower these young people to realise their potential.

I recently volunteered to deliver a
‘Find A Work Placement’ workshop to help participants take responsibility for developing and raising their skills.  Here are some things I learned from this challenging and rewarding experience:

The participating young people wanted to make a difference to their lives

The young people participating in the workshop showed real potential to succeed.  They engaged in the workshop activities (including a role play where I played  an employer they were approaching for a work placement), listened to and positively acted on the feedback given and shared in celebrating success.  They demonstrated the right qualities we all need when looking for work.

The Prince’s Trust team were fantastic

The materials and support I received from The Trust Team were always practical and useful.  As a volunteer drawing from my own professional skills and experience, I was rightly expected to make the workshop a success; The Trust helped me by providing a structured approach and suggested methods for facilitating the session with clear, specific learning objectives for those participating. This empowered me to run the session effectively with other volunteers while giving us room to share our own relevant insights and experiences throughout the day. In addition the onsite Trust Team helped participants engage in the workshop activities constructively using a positive, collaborative approach.

It was challenging and personally rewarding for me

Like all Trust volunteers, it’s intrinsically satisfying to see young people get value from your engagement.  The experience also helped develop my own business skills as I needed to adapt my working style to succeed as a workshop facilitator.  By the end of the day I had helped participants create their own individual action plans to find work placements – a positive next step in them taking responsibility for unlocking their own potential.

Find out more information about The Prince’s Trust and how you can get involved.  And if you have any thoughts on this topic, leave a reply below or contact me by email.

Supporting transformation: my thoughts from Scrum Day London 2016

As an advocate for the use of Scrum and in need of some Scrum Juice, I went with Sopra Steria colleagues Steve Forbes and John McNeill to the Scrum Day London 2016 – an event held by Scrum.Org where Ken Schwaber, co-creator of Scrum, was giving the keynote speech, and the day’s theme was “Business Agility through Professional Scrum.”

The story of the day for me was that while Scrum is popular, seen as necessary and is adopted by many, Scrum success as represented by teams delivering working software into Production every Sprint or Iteration (i.e. every one to four weeks) continues to be a challenge. Very few teams are able to report success against this measure – in fact, I was the only person in the room with a raised hand when Ken asked the question “How many of you release software every Sprint?”

The fact is, technology exists for teams to be able to release into Live every 5 minutes (or even less).

The issue appears to be that Scrum and Agile require a change in organisational thinking and support that is hard for many to implement, and in a way that allows the innovations a Scrum Team offers to be realised.

We heard first from Gunther Verheyen, co-developer of the Scaled Professional Scrum Framework, who laid out the map of the journey from a ‘waterfall’ type structure (and mind set) to one that supports Scrum. Gunther has a vision:

‘Management’ is not a collection of people exerting hierarchical powers. It is an emergent, networked structure of co-managers. Removing Impediments. Optimising a product’s value. Updating the organisation’s OS.

… and you can  view his presentation online.

Karen Bowes, Head of HR & Sustainability at Capital One gave an impressive and honest insight into how Capital One was adopting Scrum not just in software delivery, but throughout its management structure. We were reminded by Ken Schwaber that Scrum requires courage, and courage was used by Capital One to great effect: they realised that there is always ‘noise’ and conflict when new practices and change are introduced and accepted this as a fundamental part of deep transformation. The focus of their management and strategising was consciously shifted from detailed micro-planning and control to providing support for Scrum teams and the removal of impediments to Scrum team success. Not an easy journey, but one that has already reaped rich rewards for Capital One.

Ken Schwaber’s new initiative is to propose a ‘Scrum Studio’ approach, which effectively places a Scrum team (or group of teams) in a special location within an organisation, with all the support structures it needs, and allow it to get on with its job. In this way, the hope is that the impediments to successful Scrum uptake are removed and organisations can then further adopt Scrum practice at a pace they can manage if and when they see a benefit in doing so.

Whatever the future for Scrum and Agile, it is going to take motivated, influential and courageous individuals to lead and support the kind of transformations that business is being challenged to undergo.

It was a privilege to meet some of them at Scrum Day London. Do let me know your thoughts – leave a reply below, or contact me by email.

Working in IT: an education

Building relationships with schools as a STEM ambassador

Following on from our attendance at Leith Academy’s STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths) careers event, the opportunity arose for Sopra Steria to welcome a class of third year pupils to the Edinburgh office.

After our visit to Leith Academy, we found that the school pupils (and teacher) considered a career in IT to involve tasks similar to those of a career in admin, using standard tools such as Microsoft Office. The main objective of the day, therefore, was to broaden the pupils’ (and teacher’s!) perspective on what IT really is, as well as give them an insight into the great work that Sopra Steria does in the industry – but how were we going to do this in a way that would make them understand, and do so without being overly technical?

We developed an agenda of activities for the morning, with three separate sessions:

  1. We asked the pupils to break down an everyday activity such as the booking of flights, as we thought that this would be something the pupils would understand and would possibly have experienced first-hand at home. The idea was to break this seemingly straightforward task into its IT sub-parts, showing and explaining how data flows between them. Being an interactive and relaxed session, the pupils really got involved and they clearly found it both enjoyable and fascinating; they were previously unaware of how many different systems there are behind what they saw as a simple process and therefore had no concept of the levels of data involved.
  2. A presentation on UX delivered by Emily Walters and Lynsey Brownlow, which opened the pupils’ eyes to the idea of building good user experience and its importance in the development of well-designed software. This was a hands-on session, and got their brains ticking as they thought about the most user-friendly ways to redesign a standard yoghurt pot!
  3. The pupils were unleashed into the office to chat to members of staff about their roles in Sopra Steria. Rather than give them a set of questions, we encouraged them to think of different questions to ask. As staff from all areas of the business got involved from development through to HR, it gave them a great insight into the varying roles that are available in IT, and it was interesting to see how different members of our staff showed the pupils what they did, or how they answered their questions. It was also great to see such a buzz around the office from both the pupils and our staff!

It was clear that the pupils enjoyed their day, with positive feedback from both themselves (especially after they told us they had been looking forward to the day after looking up and researching our company and what we do) and their teacher, who was so impressed with our morning that she asked if Sopra Steria could act as Leith Academy’s STEM ambassador. This was a great achievement and conclusion of the morning and we hope that we can continue to build strong relationships not just with Leith Academy, but with other schools in Edinburgh and beyond.

Sopra Steria has since been approached about the possibility of doing days like this again; if this is something that you feel could benefit your school, please feel free to get in touch – we would be more than happy to help! You can leave a reply below, or contact me, or my colleagues Ross Graham or Stephen Readman by email.