Improving digital services in health care

As I awaited with eager anticipation for the second day of the Digital Health and Care Conference in Edinburgh to see digital innovation and progression in the Scottish Health Sector, a sobering thought from one of the speakers on the first day came to mind.

Whilst many retail and banking sectors have embraced complete digital transformation in their operating models, I’m sure you’ll agree that many areas of the health sector lag behind. Indeed, according to the Department of Health only 2% of current interactions are digital.

Person-centred interaction will always be at the heart of health and care, but that interaction can be better informed, more efficient and better organised , if supported by data and technology? To clarify my point I wanted to provide some examples:

  • GP Referral to Treatment (RTT) – whilst we are progressing in providing information available to the patient, why is it still difficult to provide information to the citizen regarding all the critical points in their pathway? As a patient, the only information one currently obtains is by telephoning the appropriate Health Board, contacting your GP to get them to do it, or receiving one of the paper-based letters to tell you that you’re ready to be seen by the Consultant in XX weeks time.
  • Booking an appointment – online access to GP appointments is available, but if you’ve ever gone through the process with your GP practice (at least in Scotland) it is overly complex and convoluted. I consider myself to be IT literate, but this process doesn’t seem to have the most important person in mind – the citizen. In effect, this has made little impact on a citizen’s day-to-day experience with their practice and the business model within it.

At the risk of sounding obvious, these two examples – of which there are many more – cry out for a rethink of the way the citizen interacts with services. Do we ask how a user wants to interact with the RTT process? Well, here’s an example in point. One of my family members is going for a hip replacement sometime soon. I want to emphasise ‘soon’, as they don’t actually know when. I’m sure the medical speciality know, so why can’t we provide this information to the user who wants to know to be able to plan their life effectively? Indeed, can we take learning from other sectors e.g. retail where the user is able to track the progress of their product from purchase to receipt. Why can’t we make this possible for the above example…? And I’ve not even considered the potential financial savings.

How do you get into the hearts and minds of the citizen?

The challenge that most commercial organisations had when the digital revolution started was that they created brilliant online presences which nobody used. Picture technological tumbleweed… So, commercial organisations incentivised customers to use the online functionality by offering discounts, online-only tariffs, faster fulfilment, flexibility etc. But how does this transpose itself to health care?

Looking to our Nordic neighbours, Daniel Forslund, Commissioner for Innovation and eHealth, Stockholm County Council conveyed it so well during the conference. Digital has to become the new norm. However, in order to do so, we need to incentivise citizens to use these services. This means providing digital services that the public want to use, as  and when it becomes beneficial.

Using the GP appointments example above, citizens choosing to use digital services could be given preferential appointment times – i.e., most early session appointments could be reserved for online bookings, whilst still maintaining slots for other methods of booking later in the day. These early morning sessions could also be available to book using SMS facilities from the citizen’s mobile phone.

As many of the key speakers at the Conference mentioned, digital transformation doesn’t have to be difficult, but we have to focus on the value it brings to the citizen – what information do we expect, how do we want to interact, etc?

Using service redesign techniques with the focus on putting the citizen first will enable us to deliver transformational services. It’s been done in so many areas already, so why don’t we do more for our ‘Health Consumers’? Indeed, one of the delegates argued that it’s about applying good practice that already exists in other sectors and transforming its use to new areas. Whilst I agree partly with this, I don’t think a ‘one size fits all approach’ can be taken – what happens when good practice doesn’t exist for a similar service? For me, and it sounds obvious, driving the input from service users is the key to transformational change in the way citizens interact with Health, designed by the user for the user.

Interested in hearing more about our approach to transforming customer journeys through service redesign? Leave a reply below, or contact me by email.

Inspiring digital skills in the next generation

I recently had the opportunity to go with colleagues on behalf of Sopra Steria to Victoria College in Belfast alongside Digital Shared Service (DSS) to present to fifty teenage girls on Working in IT.  It was a great opportunity for us to give something back to the local community and support Digital NI in promoting STEM subjects and digital technology careers to students.

Sopra Steria has an active role in each of our local communities where we partake in outreach programmes.

We aim to open the student’s eyes to the wonders of IT, the world of digital and its impact on individuals working and personal life.

It was a strange, but nice feeling being back in the classroom, especially being the one talking at the front! I had the challenge of beginning the session, introducing my company and myself to the students and explaining my own journey from a history degree to working in IT as a Graduate Business Analyst. I explained how not all jobs in IT are code based, the unique job roles included within IT and the different skills needed.

We next wanted to highlight the importance of IT within everyday life and introduced “Game Changer” a programme which has the ambition of raising physical fitness and promoting healthy lifestyles in children and that Sopra Steria is working on with Halton CCG and Widnes Vikings Rugby. Through the programme we have developed TRAKKA – a fitness band and associated measurement and monitoring application – and Sopra Steria’s programme lead Louise O’Leary captivated the students, challenging them to think about how simple changes in lifestyle can create big changes in wellbeing. Although the TRAKKA wristband was designed for younger kids they were interested to see how the ecosystem developed from TRAKKA:

Inspire, Inform, Improve

diagram 'trakka' ecosystem - circle of text: Nutrition, Data/Web/Apps, Information, Behaviour & Wellbeing, Academic Improvement, Activity, Content, Ideas - back to Nutrition

Data is at the heart of TRAKKA, highlighting performance and areas for improvement and following on from Louise’s presentation, another of my colleagues Dermot Boyle moved the conversation on to another important topic, data analytics, bringing it to life with real life and familiar examples. This is another emerging IT area where we will see increasing focus over the coming years and where apprentices and graduates will be able to make their mark as they start their careers. Designed to get them involved, we concluded with a quick hands-on session, asking them to answer questions from information in our TRAKKA, Power BI dashboard.

In our work with other schools and colleges across the UK, we’ve been involved in a number of projects providing Raspberry Pi kits helping to building IT and entrepreneurial skills. At the end of our visit we donated a Raspberry Pi to Victoria College to support them in working with the students to develop coding knowledge in a fun and interactive way.

Louise, Dermot and I all really loved being involved in this visit; it was fun and energetic and we really hope the students felt the same. It appears our time was well spent as the school has asked whether some of the children could take up work placements – so we may even see a few of the faces again in and around the Belfast office! It’s a big choice choosing your future career and it would be nice to think that we provided someone with that spark of inspiration to enter the world of IT.

If this is something that you feel interested in or want to know more about, please feel free to get in touch – we would be more than happy to help! You can leave a reply below, or contact me via email.

image of students at Victoria College
Our student audience at Victoria College

Look at how our sustainability programme encourages students to build skills and careers in IT.

Understand more about our vibrant team and work in Northern Ireland.

We offer great training, development and career progression prospects – find out more about our Early Careers opportunities.

The rise of the Intelligent Machine

So it’s Tuesday evening and I’m watching the BBC 10 O’clock news. There’s an article being aired around the impact that technology-driven automation is going to have on the labour market which is suggesting that by 2035, 35% of the total UK employment market may be at risk of displacement. This is a pretty sobering statement, and gives rise to philosophical debate around the impact that this will have – not just on those members of the workforce affected, but also on our education system and the nature of employment opportunity in the advent of the automation revolution. Should we be teaching our children differently, right now, to prepare them for this? How do we second guess those jobs that are likely to become obsolete and thus help our children to focus their energies in those areas less likely to be impacted? Are we in danger, as some have prophesised, of creating an unemployable underclass?

Only time will tell, and it’s human nature to want to predict the worst case scenario, but quite often the reverse scenario is the more likely outcome.

Historically speaking, advances in technology, robotics and automation have not resulted in a commensurate rise in unemployment numbers but have actually increased employment

Deloitte executed a study on this subject using census data going back to 1871 and found that, whilst certainly some jobs have been made largely redundant by technology, the labour market has responded by switching to roles in care, service and education sectors. Knowledge-based industries in particular have benefitted from the ubiquitous availability of data, and increasing ease of communication. People are generally wealthier as the costs of goods and services have dropped which, rather amusingly, has seen a 1000% rise in bar staff (so we now know where all of our extra cash is going).

But this new wave of technology, the rise of artificial intelligence and intelligent machines, will likely have an equally material impact on knowledge based industries as robotics and technology assisted machinery has had on manual labour based ones. Companies such as IBM are spearheading this movement with technologies such as Watson. Cognitive computing platforms that are able to ‘think’ in human-like ways, they can reason, understand context, and use previous experience to make future predictions and inform decision making. They are capable of conversing in natural language and, when used in conjunction with big data repositories, are able to present insight that would otherwise be impossible to achieve using conventional computational systems. Perhaps more importantly, when used in conjunction with process automation engines, they are able to execute tasks. Process automation is not a new technology – we’ve been achieving this to varying degrees of complexity for many years now. What cognitive technologies bring to the table, however, is the ability to deal with decisions. Theoretically a cognitive system can execute complex processes that, under normal circumstances, would be wholly reliant on human interaction to complete due to the inherent necessity to think, to reason, and to bring knowledge into the equation. The future potential for such technologies is only now starting to be truly understood.

If, like me, you have an overactive imagination you may be imagining a cognitive system like IBM’s Watson to be some kind of huge supercomputer with flashing lights akin to the WOPR in the seminal 1983 classic film, WarGames. Indeed the WOPR was capable of natural language processing (it could talk), it could ‘learn’ through trial and error (albeit via circa 1000 games of tic tac toe) and it was capable of making informed decisions based on access to a wide range of data (Russian nuclear missile launch trajectories). But the reality is that Watson is highly scalable and not nearly so resource hungry. When it won the US TV show Jeopardy! in 2011, beating two of the show’s most prolific and successful contestants in the process, it did so running on 100 IBM POWER 750 servers running in a massively parallel computing cluster. Since then, IBM has refined the code for enterprise use such that it can now run on a single server platform, or directly via the Cloud. The Watson algorithms are being embedded in multiple different enterprise applications, tuned for different use cases, and are already being adopted in major banking and healthcare applications, to name but a few.

Other companies are also now offering enterprise solutions that have cognitive capabilities behind them, and one area that is garnering quite a bit of interest of late is the Virtual Digital Assistant, also commonly known as (an intelligent) chatbot. If you’ve ever used a customer service chat box online, you may be familiar with the concept of a ‘bot’ that can ask certain pre-canned questions or relay information prior to handing you off to a human operator. Bots are also often used in web chat applications for things like providing help on how to use the service itself.

Historically bots have been pretty dumb. They possess no innate intelligence, and simply work from a script. Go off-script, and the bot will simply not understand the question.

Chatbots that use cognitive algorithms, on the other hand, possess two unique and potentially game changing characteristics. Firstly, the can converse using natural language, so the experience is a very close approximation to that when conversing with a real human. Secondly, they can go off-script – they can interpret questions or instructions and combine stored knowledge with probabilistic algorithms to provide you with a response that is highly likely to be appropriate and possibly even useful! Such systems need to learn over time, and can even be trained, so their true potential is not unlocked immediately. Their potential, however, is huge, the use cases are many.

So what of the impact of such technologies? For the consumer, the likes of Amazon’s Alexa or Apple’s Siri will only become more capable and increasingly useful. Integration with home automation systems and access to consumer services are the obvious starting points. At present, the vast majority of service integration is limited to vendor’s entertainment and media services, but thinking outside of the box, consider the implications of using such technology to engage with other types of service providers. Want to pay your bank bill? Why not ask Alexa to do it for you? Need to register a complaint with your utility provider? Why not have Siri do it for you? Need to book a taxi? …Cortana?! As consumer service provider organisations begin to digitise their customer engagement channels, this kind of opportunity for integration begins to open up, paving the way for a new era in automated service fulfilment.

For the enterprise the impact is likely to be significantly more material. Efficient gains made via labour arbitrage, for instance, will shift to those enabled by technology arbitrage, as automation, driven by cognitive platforms, drives the cost of service down and the quality of service up. The impact this will have on traditional delivery models could be both rapid and significant. Service providers using cheap labour to deliver cost-effective knowledge-centric services will likely need to re-evaluate their models to remain competitive. Junior roles within organisation, many of which may be traditional routes in to the industry, will need to adapt to cater to those areas that support these new technology capabilities, or else see themselves replaced by them. Commercial models too will need to adapt as customers choose to move increasingly toward consumption or outcome based models, rather than those dictated by headcount or traditional performance related targets. The opportunities are there in abundance for those providers – and consumers – who choose to embrace the technology. Indeed, in this particular case, the WOPR was way off target when it philosophically announced that “…the only way to win is not play”. Whilst that may be true of Global Thermonuclear War, it certainly isn’t true of intelligent computing platforms within the enterprise.

As for me, I’m off to play a nice game of chess…

What are your views? Leave a reply below or, if you would like to learn more about these topics, please contact me by email.

How mentoring at a hackathon helps focus on idea generation and develops potential

I love being a mentor, and recently I was part of a team who ProductForge invited to their three-day, competitive healthcare hackathon at CodeBase, Edinburgh to mentor the teams taking part and get engaged with the exciting projects that were going on and involved in idea generation and helping the teams come up with a single idea to focus on, then guiding in any way that we could.

Participants form small cross-functional teams to work on a product prototype with support from industry experts in the NHS and the wider technology community. It’s an opportunity for participants to develop new skills, network with professionals, meet potential employers or even kick-start their own company.

Image of hackathon participantsAs with any event of this nature, there was a tangible feeling of excitement – everyone was talking intensely, gesturing and sketching ideas. Some of the teams had pretty solid ideas of what they wanted to do, while others were still in the brainstorming stage – whatever their stage of idea development, the amount of energy, always impressive.

For those teams that had an idea to go forward with, I offered to run a breakout workshop focusing on UX design. For those that hadn’t picked an idea yet, we spent some time trying to help to focus their ideas on something they could work on.

Picture of hackathon particpantsThe workshop got the teams thinking about who they were creating their apps for, explaining that the smaller their focus target audience, the better they could target their research and the clearer they would be of their required functionality.

This message was made continually throughout the day, and it was great to see some of the teams altering their projects to focus on more specific user groups.

The whole day was a lot of fun, and everyone from our team was disappointed to leave at the end.

I’m one of many at Sopra Steria who spend time mentoring – especially with young people still in education who might need some help developing their full potential. It’s all part of our commitment to making a positive difference to the communities in which we live and work, and I’d recommend it to anyone.

Do you have experience in mentoring outside of your workplace? Leave a reply below or contact me by email.

Shopping with Artificial Intelligence: The frictionless family customer experience?

With Amazon, Facebook and Google all adopting an open source approach to development of their artificial intelligence (AI) services, what could this innovation mean for a family shopping on the High Street? Here are some ideas…

An end to Saturday morning parking mayhem – having to spend half an hour queuing to get into a shopping centre car park only to find out the only spaces left are on the hundredth floor can be a miserable start (and end) to a Saturday shop for the whole family.

An AI personal assistant could reduce the friction of this inconvenience by reserving a suitable car parking space at the shopping centre in advance, based on the family’s store preferences, accessibility requirements and other factors, like forecast weather. It can then send the reserved space location to the family’s in-car GPS and automatically pay for its ticket. The more an AI can effectively integrate or communicate with other systems the greater the convenience for customers.

No more bored kids looking at their mobiles – the family have spent hours traipsing from store to store failing to be engaged by any of these retail experiences. The kids are just itching to get their phones out to start socialising with their friends, and mum and dad are getting the feeling they are better off buying online.

An AI could transform the friction of this irrelevant customer experience by giving in-store products ‘personality’ –  a product can introduce itself using spoken voice to these customers (via a store branded mobile app for example), talk about its unique selling points and answer potentially any question about its suitability – all personalised using buying and social insights the AI has about the family. The more an AI can effectively apply analytics to create experiential, contextual shopping experiences, the more compelling and delightful bricks and mortar stores become for customers.

Empowered shopping without added wrinkles – So the family have found things they need and discovered lots of things they want, but mum and dad aren’t comfortable with uncontrolled spending across their bulging wallet of bank cards.

An AI could help remove the friction of this uncertainty by acting as a single channel for these customers to manage their disparate bank services in one place, giving on the spot advice about saving and spending to enable the right purchasing decisions and provide a secure, easy to use payment system using customer voice recognition (biometric authentication). The more an AI can create a platform that combines and simplifies a range of complex services; the better mobility customers have on the High Street – experiences that rival anything offered by online retailers.

If you would like more information about how digital transformation can benefit your organisation please contact the Sopra Steria Digital Practice.

 

“More is More”: Why retailers need to get even bigger to succeed in The Digital Age

With Tesco’s recent acquisition of the wholesaler Booker and Sainsbury’s buying the Home Retail Group (parent of Argos) last year, key UK market players are using inorganic growth to rapidly expand their physical retail channels. Yet given the ever-growing threat from digital disruptors like Amazon, and discounters (notably Aldi and Lidl), why would any retailer be looking to increase their bricks and mortar liabilities given this channel could be in long term decline? Here are some ideas…

The IKEA experience – perhaps ironically it is a pre-digital retail format that may offer the right approach to combining the unique strengths of the physical store experience with the choice, availability and (critically) lower prices offered by online channels. IKEA’s gigantic stores across the UK combine a compelling in-store experience where customers can physically explore a range of products with the convenience and price competitiveness of a wholesaler’s warehouse. In comparison, Amazon offers price and choice but it can’t replicate the tactical experience of interacting with a product, nor the instant fulfilment.

Sainsbury’s wants to exploit the supply chain capabilities of Argos – not just in terms of same day fulfilment, but the warehouse capacity its stores carry on the high street – physical retail as an unbeatable customer experience Amazon can’t imitate.

Best of both worlds – Arguably a challenge for both Aldi and Lidl is that their focus on lower prices constrains their ability to innovate their supply chains to deliver personalised, contextual experiences to individual customers. In response, not only can Tesco lever the supply chain capabilities provided by Booker to drive greater efficiencies across its operating model to drive stronger competitive pricing, the additional store capacity it now has available means offering greater customer convenience for its digital offerings (such as hundreds more Click+Collect points across the UK). This will enable Tesco to better blend its digital and physical customer experience together while delivering competitive pricing to rival the discounters.

If you would like more information about how digital transformation can benefit your organisation please contact the Sopra Steria Digital Practice.

The Art of Creativity…

It’s 2020, our customers are raving about our easy to use delivery process, within weeks our customers achieved their outcomes and upfront, decisions were made based on real insights that influenced how they would build their pipeline. New revenue was generated and huge savings were made. Customers, stakeholders and employees interact with our multichannel services, with ease and simplicity, gliding through systems, feeling delighted by the entire experience.

How did we do it?

We delivered solutions that use one basic formula.

Collaboration + Innovation

What does it equal?

Creative confidence

Our tools and methodologies enhance creative problem solving, they support scalability and automate the way we work, enabling our leaders and consultants to work at greater scale.

Our consultants transform business thinking by putting people at the heart of the decision process. Our technical gurus deploy systems within weeks not months. Our customers come back for more and the end user experience is seamless…

Oh wait… I’m not thinking about the future, this is now and it’s still 2017!

Our teams are already innovating and our customers are achieving their outcomes. Everyday we collaborate, our development tools have already reduced the time it takes to deliver an entire system. Our designers and researchers have improved quality of life. It’s not just technology and digital experiences, it’s:

  • Creating new approaches to health
  • Creating user-centred government services
  • Creating new ways of working for employees
  • Creating better ways to manage our money
  • Creating new ways for technology to help humans

We removed the fear of being creative and we made it familiar. Creativity is not special.

Working and delivering in a technical environment within an IT company is exciting. The opportunity to transform lives, enhance experiences – whether it’s the experience of the customer, the business or the employee has become cathartic. Technology has become the enabler. Design thinking is transforming technology. Design thinking is a core competency built for the future.

What next? Longevity

Find out how we at Sopra Steria have become masters of design thinking, integrating people into our IT process right from the start.

What are your thoughts? Leave a reply below, or contact me by email.