Supporting transformation: my thoughts from Scrum Day London 2016

As an advocate for the use of Scrum and in need of some Scrum Juice, I went with Sopra Steria colleagues Steve Forbes and John McNeill to the Scrum Day London 2016 – an event held by Scrum.Org where Ken Schwaber, co-creator of Scrum, was giving the keynote speech, and the day’s theme was “Business Agility through Professional Scrum.”

The story of the day for me was that while Scrum is popular, seen as necessary and is adopted by many, Scrum success as represented by teams delivering working software into Production every Sprint or Iteration (i.e. every one to four weeks) continues to be a challenge. Very few teams are able to report success against this measure – in fact, I was the only person in the room with a raised hand when Ken asked the question “How many of you release software every Sprint?”

The fact is, technology exists for teams to be able to release into Live every 5 minutes (or even less).

The issue appears to be that Scrum and Agile require a change in organisational thinking and support that is hard for many to implement, and in a way that allows the innovations a Scrum Team offers to be realised.

We heard first from Gunther Verheyen, co-developer of the Scaled Professional Scrum Framework, who laid out the map of the journey from a ‘waterfall’ type structure (and mind set) to one that supports Scrum. Gunther has a vision:

‘Management’ is not a collection of people exerting hierarchical powers. It is an emergent, networked structure of co-managers. Removing Impediments. Optimising a product’s value. Updating the organisation’s OS.

… and you can  view his presentation online.

Karen Bowes, Head of HR & Sustainability at Capital One gave an impressive and honest insight into how Capital One was adopting Scrum not just in software delivery, but throughout its management structure. We were reminded by Ken Schwaber that Scrum requires courage, and courage was used by Capital One to great effect: they realised that there is always ‘noise’ and conflict when new practices and change are introduced and accepted this as a fundamental part of deep transformation. The focus of their management and strategising was consciously shifted from detailed micro-planning and control to providing support for Scrum teams and the removal of impediments to Scrum team success. Not an easy journey, but one that has already reaped rich rewards for Capital One.

Ken Schwaber’s new initiative is to propose a ‘Scrum Studio’ approach, which effectively places a Scrum team (or group of teams) in a special location within an organisation, with all the support structures it needs, and allow it to get on with its job. In this way, the hope is that the impediments to successful Scrum uptake are removed and organisations can then further adopt Scrum practice at a pace they can manage if and when they see a benefit in doing so.

Whatever the future for Scrum and Agile, it is going to take motivated, influential and courageous individuals to lead and support the kind of transformations that business is being challenged to undergo.

It was a privilege to meet some of them at Scrum Day London. Do let me know your thoughts – leave a reply below, or contact me by email.

Four reasons why Scrum is so popular

A 2013 survey by the company Version 1 showed that over 50 percent of all software development projects which are being managed using an Agile method are using Scrum. A further 15 percent or so are using either a “Scrum Hybrid” or “Scrumban” (a Scrum Hybrid).  This means that around two thirds (65 percent) of all the Agile projects that were taking place in 2013 were using Scrum. In the 2014 survey, this figure had crept up to 72 percent.

Why is Scrum so popular? Many of the other methods (DSMD, XP, Kanban) seem appealing and strong claims can be found for their success.  So why, in reality, is one method dominating? Here’s why I think Scrum is so popular.

Reason #1 – Scrum has a role dedicated to making Scrum work

The main purpose of the ScrumMaster is to facilitate the Scrum process. Actually, the ScrumMaster has two main purposes, the second being to remove impediments to progress that are identified by the team.  But the best way to identify those impediments is to facilitate the Scrum process.

Reason #2 – Scrum tells you what to do

Scrum isn’t an analysis, Scrum is a practice, or rather a set of practices. You too can start doing Scrum right now.

The most popular practice is the “daily Scrum” – or “stand-up”. This is a short meeting where everyone in the team says what they did yesterday, what they’re doing today, and, crucially, what’s stopping them – their impediments. This is one of the main ways the ScrumMaster identifies impediments. And then it’s his or her job to get them removed.

It really is that easy to get started, but to do Scrum more completely, the team needs to plan work in short, fixed periods of time (referred to as “Sprints”). They reflect at the end of each Sprint, how well they did, and what they would change (in a meeting called a ‘retrospective’). Finally, the team demonstrates working software to a representative of the customer.

Reason #3 – Scrum explicitly involves the customer

In Scrum the interests of the customer are represented by the Product Owner (PO). The PO agrees with the team at the beginning of each sprint which work should be done in that sprint. At the end of the sprint, the PO reviews the resulting working software and provides feedback. If things have changed since the beginning of the last sprint (priorities, understanding, technology, politics…) these can be incorporated into what’s planned for the next sprint.

Reason #4 – That’s it

There are lots of other techniques that you can use with Scrum – user stories, continuous integration, burn-down charts, burn-up charts, estimation of tasks in hours, complexity points, etc. But NONE of these are required.

Simplicity and clarity make it easy for teams to get started using Scrum. And, in my opinion, that’s why it’s the most popular Agile method, by far.

Mastering Scrum (rather than calling yourself a ScrumMaster) is a much more difficult task, but the only way to get there is to have that first stand-up.

What is your experience in Mastering Scrum? Leave a reply below, or contact me by email.