Four reasons why Scrum is so popular

A 2013 survey by the company Version 1 showed that over 50 percent of all software development projects which are being managed using an Agile method are using Scrum. A further 15 percent or so are using either a “Scrum Hybrid” or “Scrumban” (a Scrum Hybrid).  This means that around two thirds (65 percent) of all the Agile projects that were taking place in 2013 were using Scrum. In the 2014 survey, this figure had crept up to 72 percent.

Why is Scrum so popular? Many of the other methods (DSMD, XP, Kanban) seem appealing and strong claims can be found for their success.  So why, in reality, is one method dominating? Here’s why I think Scrum is so popular.

Reason #1 – Scrum has a role dedicated to making Scrum work

The main purpose of the ScrumMaster is to facilitate the Scrum process. Actually, the ScrumMaster has two main purposes, the second being to remove impediments to progress that are identified by the team.  But the best way to identify those impediments is to facilitate the Scrum process.

Reason #2 – Scrum tells you what to do

Scrum isn’t an analysis, Scrum is a practice, or rather a set of practices. You too can start doing Scrum right now.

The most popular practice is the “daily Scrum” – or “stand-up”. This is a short meeting where everyone in the team says what they did yesterday, what they’re doing today, and, crucially, what’s stopping them – their impediments. This is one of the main ways the ScrumMaster identifies impediments. And then it’s his or her job to get them removed.

It really is that easy to get started, but to do Scrum more completely, the team needs to plan work in short, fixed periods of time (referred to as “Sprints”). They reflect at the end of each Sprint, how well they did, and what they would change (in a meeting called a ‘retrospective’). Finally, the team demonstrates working software to a representative of the customer.

Reason #3 – Scrum explicitly involves the customer

In Scrum the interests of the customer are represented by the Product Owner (PO). The PO agrees with the team at the beginning of each sprint which work should be done in that sprint. At the end of the sprint, the PO reviews the resulting working software and provides feedback. If things have changed since the beginning of the last sprint (priorities, understanding, technology, politics…) these can be incorporated into what’s planned for the next sprint.

Reason #4 – That’s it

There are lots of other techniques that you can use with Scrum – user stories, continuous integration, burn-down charts, burn-up charts, estimation of tasks in hours, complexity points, etc. But NONE of these are required.

Simplicity and clarity make it easy for teams to get started using Scrum. And, in my opinion, that’s why it’s the most popular Agile method, by far.

Mastering Scrum (rather than calling yourself a ScrumMaster) is a much more difficult task, but the only way to get there is to have that first stand-up.

What is your experience in Mastering Scrum? Leave a reply below, or contact me by email.